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Thread: Triumph Frog eye Sprite

  1. #11
    smark's Avatar
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    That’s different......



    Reminds me of the Opel GT.

    46F4AB58-4BDC-433C-B48D-8720CF59BEB4.jpg
    Last edited by smark; 08-17-2020 at 09:46 PM.

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  3. #12
    Moderator map's Avatar
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    My friend pre-ordered and got one of the first Miatas to hit town. His first issue of the Miata newsletter had a picture where a guy sealed the factory headlights down and installed bugeyes. The one pictured was a later kit, replacing the car's nose.

  4. #13

    50+ yr Abarth Lifetime Member MrFiat's Avatar


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    The Miata is definitely a very cool car, the targa version especially. But in my (admittedly opinionated) opinion the Lotus Elan had it beat in terms of style and sheer driving fum.
    I spent most of my money on fast cars, guitars and pretty women. I somehow managed to waste the rest of it.

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    I don't think there could be argument there... most Lotus cars were a blast. Their main drawback was their being built in the UK. Well, that and their current cost. Didn't they have a Ford engine with a different head? John and Michelle bought the first year Miata because it was the first reliable small sports car available here. They drove the wheels off that car w/ the only fail being a rear transmission seal fail.

    Back in '72 or '73 our paint teacher took us to see a real shop in action at the local GM dealer. In the corner sat the manager's project, I think an Elan (it's been a lot of years). He'd bought it salvage after a driver put a wheel in gravel and planted it in a cow pasture, maybe 10 feet lower than the road. After purchase he went out to the field and picked up all the pieces... and was putting the fiberglass together like a giant jigsaw puzzle. (Working weekends and evenings.)

    The Elan is one of those classics that still turns heads today.

  6. #15

    50+ yr Abarth Lifetime Member MrFiat's Avatar


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    I have pictures of my ;68 somewhere on the old computer. And you're correct. The se Elan had a Ford Cortina motor with a twin cam head and two gorgeous Weber DCOE side draft carburetors. That car was fast!
    I spent most of my money on fast cars, guitars and pretty women. I somehow managed to waste the rest of it.

  7. #16
    Moderator map's Avatar
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    I sort of miss the old carb days, especially dual carbs. You could tinker, adjusting them properly and feel a real difference. The car would hum, have more power, and fuel economy would jump 10%, instantly. The great thing, you could go back out and do it again in a few weeks, for the same experience. Owning a British car was a lot of fun 50 years ago. It was a blast if you had money or a lot of time to tinker.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by map View Post
    I sort of miss the old carb days, especially dual carbs. You could tinker, adjusting them properly and feel a real difference. The car would hum, have more power, and fuel economy would jump 10%, instantly. The great thing, you could go back out and do it again in a few weeks, for the same experience. Owning a British car was a lot of fun 50 years ago. It was a blast if you had money or a lot of time to tinker.
    My brother used to rebuild Rochester four barrel carbs, in his bedroom. He soaked parts in carb cleaner outside. The issue with carburetor cars. When you drove them in higher altitudes. You had to adjust them to run the engine better. Unlike modern fuel injection cars today.

    I not sure, I miss adjusting the dwell, set the timing, replacing points. Adjusting the carburetor idle mixture screws. Gaping the plugs. I still have my old Sun timing light, in the garage.
    Last edited by smark; 08-18-2020 at 07:10 PM.

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    I came across my old timing light about 3 months ago. I think I've used it once in the last 25 years, to isolate a misfire. It's in the same drawer as the old home-made static timer, a dwell meter and Uni-Syn tool.

    I never had much luck rebuilding Rochester carbs. Usually before I got to them, the PO had swapped them out for cheap rebuilds several times; just worn out. With no feedback, carbs never really stay in peak trim. I'd tweak the '64 'Bird once a month, to keep its Holley idling smoothly. Dad liked when he could set a glass of water on the air cleaner and it had barely a ripple. He won a lot of beer that way. The hard one was trying to keep any of my Corvairs properly balanced... like trying to catch a rainbow in a jar... walk away and it's out.

  10. #19
    smark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by map View Post
    I came across my old timing light about 3 months ago. I think I've used it once in the last 25 years, to isolate a misfire. It's in the same drawer as the old home-made static timer, a dwell meter and Uni-Syn tool.

    I never had much luck rebuilding Rochester carbs. Usually before I got to them, the PO had swapped them out for cheap rebuilds several times; just worn out. With no feedback, carbs never really stay in peak trim. I'd tweak the '64 'Bird once a month, to keep its Holley idling smoothly. Dad liked when he could set a glass of water on the air cleaner and it had barely a ripple. He won a lot of beer that way. The hard one was trying to keep any of my Corvairs properly balanced... like trying to catch a rainbow in a jar... walk away and it's out.
    My brother use to like to play with, different size jetting, in the carburetor. I use to have a dwell meter someplace.

    My good friend had a 65 thunderbird. Light blue, with a Winkled textured vinyl roof, He’s old sister had 66 T Bird. White, with a red interior. He’s T Bird had a reverb amplifier in the trunk. Connected to the radio. Every time the car, hit a bump in the road, he would make some crazy reverb noise. The car had a 390 CID engine. I think it got around 9 mpg. I liked the swing in steering wheel, air craft control levers, and the coolest feature, where the repeating tail lamps. The rear end sat so low to the ground. The interior was so space aged.

    599B0CF1-3DC4-4D15-AA42-FE2135C73ADB.jpg
    Last edited by smark; 08-19-2020 at 10:54 AM.

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  12. #20
    Senior Member HalfPint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smark View Post
    My brother used to rebuild Rochester four barrel carbs, in his bedroom. He soaked parts in carb cleaner outside. The issue with carburetor cars. When you drove them in higher altitudes. You had to adjust them to run the engine better. Unlike modern fuel injection cars today.

    I not sure, I miss adjusting the dwell, set the timing, replacing points. Adjusting the carburetor idle mixture screws. Gaping the plugs. I still have my old Sun timing light, in the garage.
    Rochesters were a GM abomination. Good carbs were of two basic design concepts, either with a fixed jet and fixed venturi, or a variable jet/venturi (“constant velocity”, aka SU). The Rochester was some weird hybrid nightmare from GM where needless complexity was the answer to everything. Yet a good fixed jet/venturi carb like a Weber, Holley or Motorcraft 2100/4100 was far superior.
    Completely stock 2016 500 Abarth, Rhino & Nero,
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