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Story Time - Plus DIY TD04 Upgrade
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Thread: Story Time - Plus DIY TD04 Upgrade

  1. #1
    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    Post Story Time - Plus DIY TD04 Upgrade

    Out of boredom and enjoyment for discussing these cars, I've decided to do a little bit of a write-up on my TD04 journey. As I write this, I'm 90% done, but I tried to take some pictures along the way so I should have plenty to show.

    A little bit of background. About 2 years ago, I snagged a wicked deal on a 1752 turbo from our fellow Dodge Dart cousins. I ran this turbo in 'stock' 1752 form for about a year. After about 1 year of running it, I had just gotten back from the Dragon and noticed the car was sluggish. As always, my first reaction was boost leak test. I noticed that air was actually leaking into the CHRA of the turbo and down the oil return line. Obviously this was pretty concerning, along with the fact that the turbo had a huge amount of axial shaft play.



    Unfortunately, though I had worked to modify the car during the winter in order to use it all summer long, I had to tear the car down and send the turbo out. Knowing their familiarity with our 1446 turbo, plus a close friend who had his 1752 upgraded by them, I decided to send it to GPOP Turbo Shop. After tearing down my turbo, they gave me a call and let me know the status. Their general consensus was that I was running this thing hard. They said the excessive heat and backpressure had done it in. I decided to go all out in an effort to prevent future failure, I basically paid for a new turbo. Here is the breakdown. I read a lot of mixed information about clipping the turbine wheel to help reduce backpressure, but decided it would be in my best interest because after all, that was my enemy with this setup.









    After getting this beautiful turbo back in a timely manner, big shout out to GPOP, I slapped it in. They had the preload set pretty high on the WGA and this thing built boost fast, but way too much. As I started dialing it back, I eventually got to zero. It was only at zero preload that the car would not overboost. Anything more, even 1 turn, and I was blowing clear past 30psi. I then put a pump on the WGA (stock Garrett style one that comes from ATP with this turbo) and noticed that the crack pressure was proper without preload, but as soon as I preloaded the rod, the diaphragm would leak and the WGA would not extend. Thinking back, I had a similar issue even before sending it to GPOP, and I always ran excessively low preload. I believe this may have been another factor in overworking the turbo that may have lead to its initial demise.

    Anyways, while I was waiting for the turbo, I also threw in Tork MA springs & MTD Stage 2+ cam. Did the timing belt while I was in there, at around 87k miles. The car was an animal. The top end was sick, and though the spool was definitely slower (more of a progressive buildup) I didn't miss it for a second. In 2nd, for autocross, the gearing made the car snappy as is. On the track, it could breathe up top. At this time, I also had John at Tork finally write me a Meth specific tune. He wrote two tunes, so I could flash one if I didn't have Meth. His request was to run 100% methanol, and luckily I have a cheap source. Prior to this I was running washer fluid. I played around with some nozzle sizes to minimize power loss. Sure, there might be some power loss without being tuned for the extra 'fuel' but the car was 100% consistent. It pulled the same every time, to the point where I probably would have done this as a first mod had I known.





    On the Meth tune, the car was the fastest it's ever been. I finally went out to the drag strip for the first time in my life. I wasn't focused on reaction time, I just wanted to get familiar with launching the car and nailing clean shifts. My hope, based on knowing my setup, was to break into the 13's and trap over 100mph. Well, the night went on and the 13 wasn't coming. Towards the end of the night, I finally switched lanes only to find out that the new lane had way better prep. Of course the only decent run I put together in that lane, the timing system glitched. With my junk 60', these were my best ET and trap speed. This is a full interior car with a rear seat delete.



    To be continued..
    Last edited by Shailer Andrew; 08-13-2020 at 12:21 AM.
    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    Later in the fall, myself and a couple of other guys from central OH and MI took a trip down to the Dragon. All of the Fiat guys had been to FOTD before, but it was the first time for some others. We rented a cabin near Gatlinburg but spent most of our time out on the road. After one of our runs, we actually ran into Matt Farah who was a super cool guy. He was telling us about his recent all expense paid tour of one of the Porsche factories. He and another guy had brand new Porsche 992 that they were flogging. We actually ran into him down at the dam as well, and he gave us a nice demonstration of launch control.








    On our last day there, we went over to Devil's Triangle, a definite favorite of mine. I was leading for the entire trip, which has its implications, but this time it got me. First, as some may know, there is an offroad park located within the 'triangle' of this road. That's why it's not uncommon to see dirtbikes, side by sides, rock buggies etc. driving down the road. Unfortunately for me, one of them dropped a rock that was probably the size of a baseball. I ended up clipping this thing, which resulted in a horrendous shake from the rear of my car. The wheel was bent unlike anything I've experienced. These were OZ Alleggerita HLTs, which are no cheap (or weak) wheel. Luckily we were near this large gravel lot which some may also recognize. One fellow Fiat buddy carried a spare wheel, so I was able to swap it out.



    After hanging out and getting the wheel changed, another friend wanted to move up in the pack to try chasing me. We took off, and no less than 45 seconds later, I encountered a cresting right hander to a dipping left. I carried a little too much speed, and remember thinking "well I can cut the mustard and make the left" but I despise cutting the mustard. I tried holding my lane, but the car was pushing wide. I slowly pushed into the ditch/embankment on the top side of the hill. The front right wheel dug into the soft dirt, so I basically did a stoppie and then flopped over on the driver side as the car rotated from decelerating the right front. By the time we rolled, I had lost so much speed, so no airbags deployed and it was quite mellow. In hindsight, I let my ego get to me. My buddy who wanted to chase, was clipping the yellow pretty hard to keep up (after reviewing video) so I basically had no chance to outrun him no matter how hard I tried. It was a learning experience, and luckily no injuries were sustained along the way. It was time to dial back the street driving and spend the money on track days instead of road trips.



    After everyone else finally caught up and saw the underside of the Fiat, we gathered ourselves and rolled the car back over in the ditch. We let it sit for a little while, and then the thing fired right up. The brakes were wicked soft, so I was worried a line had broke, but luckily it was just a bunch of air. My friends were able to push me out of the ditch while I drove it in reverse. We cleaned any debris off the road, told a local redneck with 3 teeth that we didn't need any help, and drove the heck out of there. I quickly realized that the right front control arm was broken because any time I decelerated the tire was rubbing into the body. I was able to get the car to the Brushy Mountain Distillery/Penitentiary at the end of the triangle. Other than smoking out the road and making people mad that we were doing 10mph (I basically had no brakes) it went pretty well.



    The manager of the distillery was super cool and considering the huge size of the lot, he let me keep the car inside of the barbed wire fence overnight (I had a broken sunroof and quarter glass window) so I could pick the car up in the morning. We grabbed a Uhaul, loaded it up, and pulled it home to OH for sub $400. All in all, it went pretty smoothly. I bought the car back from insurance for $1000 (no brainer considering the value of the mods) and bought a super clean, bone stock Neon SRT4 as my new summer daily driver. My first car was a Neon ACR (non SRT4) so this was something I always wanted.







    As for the Fiat, the only mechanical damage was the broken control arm and bent sway bar end link. I picked up a control arm for $75, straightened the end link, changed the plugs (extremely fouled from all of the oil) and the car ran and drove flawlessly. Not even a single check engine light or error code. The body was relatively beat up, but it was time to begin a new phase of having a dedicated fun car. The hilarious part was that Blipshift did a run of a red 500 Abarth shirt within a week or two of our trip. My friend jokingly rotated the shirt upside down and sent it to all of the guys. I reached out to Blipshift and they were cool enough to do a special run for my friends and I with an inverted image just so we could remember the experience.

    Last edited by Shailer Andrew; 08-13-2020 at 12:21 PM.
    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    Fast forward through the winter, the Fiat is now stripped of all non-essentials. I made a significant amount of money selling interior bits, well over what I bought the car back from insurance from, so all in all I wasn't complaining. I banged out the dents enough so that the window could go up and down, the rear hatch could open and close, driver door handle would sit straight, and the passenger door wouldn't hit the front fender. Other than that, no plans for bodywork. The guy who replaced the windshield had some polycarbonate laying around and hooked me up with 2 rear quarter windows for $40. I had a scrap Dodge Neon hood laying around, so I cut the skin off of it and made a sunroof delete panel. It's about as pretty as the rest of the body, ain't care. It seals nicely against the existing sunroof seal. The Assetto Corse lip I never installed hid the massive kink in the bottom lip of the bumper.





    I recently bought a house, come to find out there is a drag strip 15 minutes away that charges $15 for test n tune every Friday night. Time to become a regular. I went for a few weeks, but was striking out on achieving the 13s still. I picked up from my previous attempt before the wreck, but was running consistent 14.1. One night I tried switching from my RE71R tires to a set of R888R in the front just to experiment. I aired them way down, and rather than roll straight up to the line, I would do a quick launch near the water box to clean them off. This seemed to help me get out a bit better. Additionally, I realized that starting the car only as I was up to run helped a significantly versus idling up the staging lanes. Even though the meth cools everything down during the run, something seems to be much happier when I make the initial hit already cooled off.

    All this lead to finally breaking into the 13s with a solid trap speed, I could tell the car liked being cool.



    I forgot to mention that one other mechanical part that also needed to be replaced was the radiator. During the wreck, it got bent pretty badly, and though it didn't leak, the lower pins were broken off in the rubber mounts. Similarly, the condenser (deleted) and intercooler had some damage. I have a DIY intercooler setup that I got for free from a kind gentlemen I met at FOTD years ago. I had redone all of the piping by this point, but still had a cheap cxracing core. It didn't really matter much with the meth, but it had seen better days. I was doing a bunch of research and ended up buying this new old stock PWR tube & fin intercooler. Typically, most people stick with bar and plate (there is plenty of documentation explaining pros/cons) but this was a beautiful piece. Not so common, this one had extruded tubes, so they are much thicker and more durable against impacts, plus they have pretty complex profiles to increase surface area. I got this for $230 from a distributor in Indiana, they're based in Australia, and have been known to put out some legit cores. It was a good alternative to spending probably double on a Garrett or Bell. I built a new bracket for it and it fit right up to my existing piping. This was basically the max height I could fit without significant bumper beam modification. This intercooler hangs at around 15deg above ambient during cruising, versus the 30deg ambient with the cxracing core.





    Around this time, I also went to a private track day at New York Safety Track. Anyone reading this, who lives in that area, should seriously check it out. The track has awesome elevation change and is a lot of fun. Shortly after running the 13, I noticed the car begin to get seriously sluggish. It was spooling wicked slow, throwing underboost codes more often (not entirely uncommon in 5th with a bigger turbo setup), but it definitely wasn't happy. The turbo had a huge amount of axial shaft play again, so guess what? Time to tear it down for the thousandth time.
    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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    You need to add an Autopower Cage to your list of mods ASAP. That car is no longer structurally sound.
    2020 DODGE Challenger R/T Scat Pack Widebody
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    "I thought you had a HEMI. Yeah, I had to have a footprint gas pedal installed. So I stole this pile."

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    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddySRT View Post
    You need to add an Autopower Cage to your list of mods ASAP. That car is no longer structurally sound.
    Yeah, I'll make one this winter.
    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    TD04 Time

    Disassembly time. I pulled the 1752 turbo off the car, and found some pretty ugly sights when I pulled the housings. There was so much axial shaft play that the wheels made serious contact. The compressor wheel was mangled and gouged out the compressor housing. Additionally, the turbine wheel was also pushed into the heat shield for the CHRA, perfectly gouged on the back side due to contact.



    I was doing some more reading, and my guess is the the backpressure/boost ratio was exceeding 1:1 for quite some time. Though the hot side was P&P, turbine wheel clipped, in the end it's still a stock frame. So, where typical thrust direction would be towards the turbine side (boost pressure exceeding backpressure), mine was the opposite. After pulling the CHRA apart, I found that the small thrust washer that sits within the larger brass thrust bearing, was basically worn to half its original thickness, along with the brass also being worn. As the rotating assembly pushed on the journal bearing, this pushes on the thrust washer. Add heat and continued abuse and it's a recipe for wear.

    Left thrust washer is good, right one is worn, along with center of thrust bearing.



    At this point, having had each build of my 1752 only last a year, I was ready for something different. Something that was not only bigger, but also has parts more readily available, is modular, has actual published specs and info, and was cheaper to build than our overpriced journal bearing turbos. Enter the TD04. At first I contemplated picking up the TD04 kit from TMC. It's a pretty smoking deal including the downpipe. In the end, my dad convinced me to try making my own setup, which has been fun and taught me more about the TD04 lineup. Additionally, I don't know the spec on that TMC TD04 but I suspect it's of the smaller variety. I wanted something that I could recite the specs of, and also find compressor maps for.

    In my research, I quickly realized how extensive the TD04 line really is. I knew they put this turbo on everything, but dang. To break it down simply, here is the quick and dirty. I decided to go with a TD04HL-19t 7cm2.

    The HL is an indicator of the turbine wheel size. There are the following sizes listed as exducer/inducer dimensions in mm of the turbine wheel (copied from another source so don't quote me if I'm 1mm off). There can also be a letter R, indicating reverse rotation like on my Neon. For reference, my 1752 wheel was 38/43.

    TD04: 40/47
    TD04L: 41.3/47
    TD04H: 44.2/52
    TD04HL: 45.6/52


    The 19t is an indicator of the compressor wheel size. They can range from 12t (there are smaller though) up to 22t at least from what I've seen, but 19t is the largest OEM option that I've found. Any bigger and you have to machine the CHRA to accept the exducer diameter of the compressor wheel. With different wheel sizes, you also need to have a matching compressor housing so that the profile matches the wheel. Again, anything over 19t and you might be looking at having it machined. You might also see 13g, 15g designations. Again this refers to the compressor wheel size, but these compressor wheels are flat back vs super back. Super back means it tapers to have more material near the center of the wheel. This is a picture of my 1752 wheel, which would be called a superback in Mitsu terms. I was pushed towards choosing the 19t because of my knowledge of opiateESP (Eddie) TD05-16g on his 500T. The compressor map for my turbo is very similar to his, so this gave me some confidence in what it could achieve. Also, Tork was instrumental in that setup and my car is also tuned by Tork.

    Superback Style Compressor Wheel (1752)



    Compressor Wheel Recessed into CHRA (reason why a 19t can't be put on a 13t CHRA without machining)



    Here are a few dimensions of compressor wheel inducer/exducer in mm. For reference, my 1752 wheel was 40/51.5.
    13t: 40.64/56
    15t: 42/56
    16t: 43.4/56
    19t: 46/58

    My original hope was to use a CHRA my dad took off of a Forester XT to save some money. In the end, I decided not to because that turbo is a TD04L-13t. It really isn't much larger than my current 1752 and you can't put an HL turbine housing on an L CHRA. I was particular about wanting to get an OEM Mitsubishi CHRA for reliability, then I could get China-made housing to make the setup exactly how I want.

    I picked up a TD04HL-15t CHRA from a Saab for about $125. My dad had just done an upgraded compressor wheel on his Forester XT from a 13t to a 19t, only having to change the compressor housing. Because of this, I thought I could slap a 19t wheel on the 15t Saab CHRA. That was not the case. More reading, and I found that the Subaru wheel upgrade is specially designed to work with the 13t CHRA. In other words, the inducer is the size of a 19t, but then tapers to a 13t to fit the CHRA. ((So if anyone wants to try this upgrade I have the Saab CHRA for sale))

    1752 Turbine (left) vs Saab HL Turbine (right)



    More researching, and I find that the Hyundai Sonata 2.0T/ Kia Optima have the largest spec OEM TD04. They came with a TD04HL-19t (it's actually a twin scroll exhaust manifold too). It also has an 11 blade turbine wheel vs the more common 12 blade (like on the Saab unit). This should reduce rotating mass and help flow better. I picked up the full turbo for about $125 again. This thing was immaculate, still has bright inspection mark paint on the wheel. Going along with my plan, I picked up a 19t compressor housing and a Volvo 850 style TD04HL exhaust housing. I went with this one for a few reasons.

    Hyundai Sonata TD04HL4S Turbo



    1: The Volvo housing has a larger A/R than the Saab ones, coming in at 7cm2 vs 6cm2. For reference, the stock exhaust housing on our cars is 0.40

    Again, a unique measurement on Mitsubishi turbos is the A/R. To compare them to Garrett, this is the conversion I found from another source.
    6 cm2 = 0.41 A/R
    7 cm2 = 0.49 A/R
    8 cm2 = 0.57 A/R
    9 cm2 = 0.65 A/R
    10 cm2 = 0.73 A/R
    11 cm2 = 0.81 A/R
    12 cm2 = 0.89 A/R


    2: It has a 3in downpipe outlet vs 2.5in on the Saab. The Volvos came with angled and straight downpipe flange designs, the angled supposedly flows better. This was all I could find anyways.

    Volvo TD04 7cm Angled Housing w/ Generic 19t Comp Housing



    Realistically, you can build a TD04-13t 6cm2 that is nearly identical in spec to what my 1752 was. Then there is plenty of room to go up from there. So no, TD04 does not mean 'lag monster'.

    Here are a bunch of comparison images.

    Saab 12 Blade HL Turbine (left) vs. Hyundai 11 Blade HL Turbine (right)



    Saab 15t Compressor (left) vs. Hyundai 19t Compressor (right)



    1752 Compressor (left) vs 19t Compressor (right)



    1752 Turbine in HL Exhaust Housing



    1752 Compressor in 19t Compressor Housing

    Last edited by Shailer Andrew; 08-14-2020 at 08:19 PM.
    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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    Senior Member aelfwyne's Avatar
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    In for the read.
    2015 Rosso Abarth - MAD FIAT - 5 Speed - Phase 2
    2015 Granito Lucente 500T - Proyecto Estupido (Salvage) - Auto - OFT Stage 1

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    16 500X Pop, Rosso, 1.4T/M6, 18 O.Z. 45th Anniversary wheels, H&R springs, Momo shift knob, K&N drop in, MPX Throttle Body, Deyeme Racing CDV delete, Magnaflow (Renegade) cat-back with custom 2.5 B-pipe by http://stagefp.com/, ATP Highflow downpipe.

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    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    With the turbo built, I needed to get it mounted. After a little searching, I found a T3/T4 to GT1446 adapter on eBay. It was $75. As I'm still building up my tools/capabilities, i figured I could either buy a drill press and material to make my own, or just buy this premade one with higher accuracy and no hassle. After receiving the flange, I realized this one wouldn't work. Certain holes that needed to be threaded weren't, the center hole transitioned from GT1446 to rectangular T3/T4, and worst off, it was orienting the turbo 90deg from how it should be.



    I gave the shop a call, and the owner Joey explained that this was actually used to mount a GT1446 on other cars (downsize turbo application?). Anyways, he told me to make up some drawings of what I needed and he would have it made. He did all of this at no cost besides shipping the new one. As he said, this was basically giving him a new product to sell, so I think that's why he worked with me. I'm not sure if he listed this on eBay, but if you decide to go this route, and need to change hole sizes or anything, he can work with you.



    2 Studs Thru Turbo, OEM Volvo Gasket



    4 Studs Thru Manifold, OEM Fiat Gasket



    Adapter Flange Mounted to Turbo



    For the Volvo turbine housing, two of the holes are threaded and two are thru holes. Custom Fab Shop provided these bolts and counter bored the thru holes accordingly. The exahust inlet in the Volvo housing is a circular hole, which matched the Fiat ellipse quite well, so I had that shape carried straight through. The housing could be ground a little but to open it up to match perfectly. I reused the ARP accessory studs I had for the connection to the manifold, the stainless makes everything so nice to disassemble.

    In the image above, you can also see the AN adapter fittings for the oil feed and coolant supply/return. The oil feed fitting (can't recall the thread size off hand but it was the same as my 1752) is -4AN and then the coolant fittings are M12x1.25 -6AN. Depending on what CHRA you use, the coolant supply and return could be different. For instance, the Saab had them on opposite sides, with plugs in the others. This can be modified if needed. I liked the Hyundai one, because both of them were on the back side of the turbo, which made for a really clean install.

    After having removed/installed the turbo multiple times, I switched the OEM exhaust manifold studs for ARP accessory studs as well. No longer do I have to deal with the interference design of the factory studs/nuts. Make sure to put some sealant on these studs. At least 4 of them thread into oil galleys in the head, and they will seep some oil if you don't.



    I also started using Stage8 locking fasteners for the turbo and manifold nuts. After having had a turbo stud back out (some others have had this happen as well, it may be worsened by not running the top support bracket on the 1752), I didn't want to deal with that again. The top outer two manifold studs are too far from anything for the anti-rotation tab to contact, so I left it off. Those are easy to access to check torque in the future.

    Stage8 Locking Fasteners



    With the turbo mounted, I made the WGA mounting bracket. I was able to use my existing TIAL bent rod actuaor, I just had to extended the rod a little bit. It fits like OEM, almost perfectly within the shape on the exhaust manifold gasket. Also, the nice part about the universal compressor housing are the preexisting bolt holes for mounting a bracket, no welding required. I went with 1/8" steel for the final bracket based on a Subaru OEM bracket. The original mockup shown below was with 16ga steel and I would see some deflection when I applied preload.



    I made the AN coolant lines and already had the AN oil feed from my previous setup. Two 90s out the back of the turbo allowed the lines to clear the compressor housing just fine. I just had to make sure the compressor housing was clocked properly so the lines could go below the WGA bracket. For the line that goes to the after-run pump, I cut back the rubber line and installed a 3/8" barb to -6AN male, and then for the one that ties into the coolant pipe I already had the adapter (from ATP) and -6AN male to female tight radius 90. I applied Earls Flame Guard to these lines as well. This stuff is amazing, I had at nearly resting on the hot side of the turbo and it shows no signs of melting or deformation.

    -6AN Coolant Lines



    For the oil return, the factory one nearly lined up, but it's a complete hard line and is a pain to work with. I had the oil return from a Subaru, which is just the flange with a barb that goes to a rubber hose. Mimicking this concept, I picked up this high temp rubber oil return line from ATP, cut the Subaru return and Fiat return shorter, and added this rubber hose to allow for slight misalignment and eliminate any stress. I then threw Earls Flame Guard over the entire oil return.


    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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    Senior Member Shailer Andrew's Avatar
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    For the BOV I went with the HKS SSQV IV, mostly because the Forge Euro (for sale still if anyone wants just the valve w/spring kit $125) has a squeal/squeak that always made people laugh so I figured I'll give this a try. I have seen some others mount it adjacent to the intercooler, visible through the front grille (or lack thereof) but I wanted to maintain the clean look of two bare pipes on either side of the intercooler. I found a spot right before the charge pipe, in front of the transmission that let me orient it with the opening facing down, and also pointed the vacuum line towards the passenger side. I had a guy weld the bung onto my existing intercooler pipe.



    I'm still using the Forge solenoid to run the BOV. For those that aren't aware this solenoid T's into the boost reference line from the compressor housing. On throttle, it sends boost pressure to the BOV, and then during an off throttle event, the solenoid opens and pulls a vacuum on the BOV via the brake booster vacuum. If you were to run the BOV line directly to the manifold, you will throw a P2261 code, because the car will see too much residual pressure during an off throttle event as a result of the BOV not opening quickly or far enough. I'm not sure if this is due to low vacuum or is related to Multiair controlling the valves rather than throttle plate, which would affect vacuum generation in the manifold.

    When I was disassembling the car, I found oil in some of the BOV and WG vacuum lines. Additionally, I found that my WGA was full of oil. It looks like the old turbo pushed oil out the boost reference line (which feeds both solenoids) while on its way out. I took everything apart and cleaned it out. Here is a nice spot on the timing belt cover I used for mounting the Forge solenoid.



    At this point I'm basically caught up to real time. Last night my dad and I made the downpipe. Originally, I was going to buy a catless downpipe for our car, cut the vband off and modify it to work with the new turbo/Volvo flange. That would put me around $300 after buying a piece of stainless pipe in addition to the downpipe. Instead, I picked up two 3" Kooks stainless J-bends (3.5" bend radius), the bottom flange from ATP, and a 3" to 2.5" formed reducer from Motion Raceworks. Realistically, this could be done with a single J-bend, which would put the cost at ~$140.



    As you can see, some modification to the radiator support was required to fit the turbo. Additionally, I decided to ditch the hood lock because it sits extremely close to the downpipe and would probably contact with engine movement. Ignore the rough cut on the rad support for now, I just needed to get the car together so I could move it around. I'll be cleaning this up tonight and providing detailed images of what was modified. I'll also address the hood lock situation.

    The need for modification/ hood lock removal stems from the design of the Volvo turbine housing compared to stock. It has much more of a forward lean (larger distance between the exhaust inlet and rotation axis of the turbo) so the whole turbo sits further forward. I'm not sure if the Saab or other hot sides would help pull the turbo back. Though the Volvo setup does fit, it's not as friendly as a swap as I thought. I was hoping to be able to encourage others to try it, but I understand this gets into the realm of modification that some aren't fond of. For me, well... you've seen the images above
    Last edited by Shailer Andrew; 08-18-2020 at 10:13 AM.
    2013 Fiat 500 Abarth - Rosso

    1752. and things.

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