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Thread: Best Suspension for DD?

  1. #11
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    Eibach pro kit with koni rear shocks. Spring rates are the same as stock and lowers it only slightly, keeping a nice amount of available travel.
    rear bar also will settle the rear end.
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  3. #12
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    I'm no expert, but would think as mentioned above that good tires will be a start, and then a bigger rear bar might help.

    Some very simple things to do that don't cost anything are to make sure you have the right air pressure in your tires, and if your ride is too rough you can always go a LITTLE higher, but do not go up to the max pressure printed on the tires.

    Beyond that (and for autocross) I've added Koni yellows all around and then lowered it with springs, and that has made it MUCH stiffer and rougher riding in everyday driving. My shocks are on setting 3 of 5, so maybe if they were set softer it would help for daily.
    2013 Rosso Abarth with 61K miles, Koni yellow shocks, Madness springs, Neu-f rear sway bar, EBC Yellowstuff brake pads, DOT4 brake fluid, K&N air filter, autocross 17 inch Ciao Milano wheels with Bridgestone Potenza RE71R, daily wheels stock 16 inch Dunlop DZ102. 2017 1st place HS Tidewater Sports Car Club: 2016-2015 1st Place TSCC GS class; 2014-2013: 2nd place in SCCA South Carolina Region G Stock.
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    Thanks for all the comments. I'm willing to trade off some ride to tighten it up. I will start with the front supports and the larger rear sway bar. What about Neu-f springs for the drop and going with koni's all around? Also, with only 4k miles and if I'm going to change tires, what is the largest size rim I can go with without modifications? If the Michelin's are that good maybe more rubber on the road is worth looking into...

    PCW

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    Alignment is very important for starters. Make sure your rear toe is in spec. I've heard too many horror stories of people not knowing why their car is so stupidly twitchy and then it turns out the rear toe is like half a degree out of spec. If it's not in spec it needs to be shimmed which is annoying, but definitely check.

    Secondly, a thicker rear torsion bar will make the car feel less understeery and more neutral, I use the Neu-F 28mm one on my car. Lowering springs are good if you don't want to go full coil overs, but IMO you don't want to overdo it. H&R, Vogtland, and Eichbach pro kit are all good choices to get the center of gravity down a little. Thicker chassis braces make the front end feel a bit nicer with turn in and hard cornering. El Gato and DNA both have good replacements for those.

    Finally, if you want maximum adjustability, go full coilover. Bilstein and Vogtland have good kits for these cars. KW is probably the best overall without going full wallet rape with an Ohlin or custom setup, but it will cost you regardless.

    And tires as have been mentioned are a huge upgrade. Bridgestone RE-71 tires are insane on this car (or any other). If you want more street oriented tire the Firestone Indy 500 is very good.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ice445 View Post
    Alignment is very important for starters. Make sure your rear toe is in spec. I've heard too many horror stories of people not knowing why their car is so stupidly twitchy and then it turns out the rear toe is like half a degree out of spec. If it's not in spec it needs to be shimmed which is annoying, but definitely check.

    Ohlin or custom setup, but it will cost you regardless.
    Good advice and often overlooked. Checking mine this week also trying to get the rear camber angle right for my car since I dropped it 2.5" I think is a bit over on the negative side.

    Oh, you've to mention the "O" word right............. Öhlins .
    Last edited by pvflyer; 06-26-2018 at 03:24 AM.
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

    What's a Abarth?...... Glad you ask! Abarth is a small demon that will possess your soul and inspire you to get steezy at every opportunity.

    della folgore l'impeto

    panem et circenses. Latin, literally "bread and circuses," supposedly coined by Juvenal and describing the cynical formula of the Roman emperors for keeping the masses content with ample food and entertainment.

  8. #16
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    My tramlining didn’t do away for me until I changed tires.
    2013 500c Abarth - phase 3
    2012 500 Pop - daily
    2016 Range Rover Evoque - Wifey's

  9. #17
    Senior Member Amacento's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiat500USA View Post
    The thing that sticks in my mind is you want a smoother ride. As most aftermarket suspension drops the ride height, you loose suspension travel, plus the springs are generally stiffer. The smoothest riding suspension will likely be what you have already. If you want a smoother riding car, going to the Turbo springs will be softer and more comfortable, but will raise your ride height. The ride will be better, but your twitchyness will remain, though.

    Aftermarket suspension is going to be a compromise to get a specific goal. For example, I wanted to lower my ride height and went with an Eibach Pro Kit and the rear Konis. I would say the ride is similar to stock, plus I got the drop I wanted, so I am happy with it.

    Coilovers are geared towards performance and tight ride control, plus have the height adjustability. Some also offer adjustable damping. Their priority is not improving ride comfort over a stock suspension, though. The best you'd probably get is something that rides close to stock, but that is going to be pretty subjective and it can be expensive to 'try out'.

    As others have suggested, to get rid of the twichyness change the shocks and try the rear sway bar and then see how you like it. Changing things slowly may be the way to go if comfort is your priority.

    The Pirelli's are also known for tramlining, so changing those may be the first thing to do.
    This. Stock setup is likely the most comfortable you're going to experience. Performance is measured on different things. Eibach Pro Kit with Koni "yellows" work good on a 500 with 16" wheels, but more sidewall on a 15" would be better than the 16" offers. I recommend reading a lot about wheel setups and asking specific questions while offering VERY specific needs-desires-objectives.

    Best of luck.
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  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiat500USA View Post
    The thing that sticks in my mind is you want a smoother ride. As most aftermarket suspension drops the ride height, you loose suspension travel, plus the springs are generally stiffer. The smoothest riding suspension will likely be what you have already. If you want a smoother riding car, going to the Turbo springs will be softer and more comfortable, but will raise your ride height. The ride will be better, but your twitchyness will remain, though.

    Aftermarket suspension is going to be a compromise to get a specific goal. For example, I wanted to lower my ride height and went with an Eibach Pro Kit and the rear Konis. I would say the ride is similar to stock, plus I got the drop I wanted, so I am happy with it.

    Coilovers are geared towards performance and tight ride control, plus have the height adjustability. Some also offer adjustable damping. Their priority is not improving ride comfort over a stock suspension, though. The best you'd probably get is something that rides close to stock, but that is going to be pretty subjective and it can be expensive to 'try out'.
    Not necessarily .

    Some coilovers can be fully re-valved and height can be adjusted without affecting preload or travel. lets say Öhlins or brand-X coilover internals are 46mm in diameter technically you should be able to swap parts and build a suspension for your liking... mix and match parts. You can take some of the Öhlins internal organs and transplant to another coilover if the inside diameters are the same " Frankenstein " coilover . you also should be able to work with oil weight that would provide a different ride quality.

    You should be able to adjust spring rates choose a progressive or linear spring curve ,better seals and bushings less friction. piston, shims , and cartridge can be re-worked for more or less oil flow. giving you a harder or smoother ride.

    I am going to do a coilover project soon, planing in buying a entry level coil over and swap internal with better seals,piston, shims ,oil, coils ...etc .

    I will post in here when I am done with it.

    HAPPY 4th EVERYBODY
    Last edited by pvflyer; 06-30-2018 at 10:20 PM.
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

    What's a Abarth?...... Glad you ask! Abarth is a small demon that will possess your soul and inspire you to get steezy at every opportunity.

    della folgore l'impeto

    panem et circenses. Latin, literally "bread and circuses," supposedly coined by Juvenal and describing the cynical formula of the Roman emperors for keeping the masses content with ample food and entertainment.

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  13. #19
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    I'm running the 500 madness aggressive springs with konis in the front and kybs in the rear. Overall I'm very happy with the handling for a daily, it sits a little low so if the roads around you are bad you'll have to try to avoid potholes and take it slow over speedbumps, but other than that it's fairly comfortable and feels very stable through corners. The adjustability on the Konis is definitely worth the extra cost, especially up front since it allows you to dial in the steering feel a little bit. I imagine it's also helpful for the rears, but I didn't want to spend the extra cash given how cheap the KYBs were.

    Chassis stiffening will also improve responsiveness and stability in cornering. The vertical chassis braces made a huge difference for me in terms of front end steering feel.
    2013 500t
    oft stg2, catless downpipe, center exit exhaust with hfc, custom short-ram intake, corsaforza fmic, gfb dv+, catch can, poly filled motor/trans mounts, nuef ss adapter, koni front/kyb rear shocks, madness agr springs, vertical chassis braces, ebc redstuff pads, rally mudflaps, roof rack, 180w led lightbar

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