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KYB Rear Shock Set up - Page 4
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Thread: KYB Rear Shock Set up

  1. #31
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    Good question. Seeing as 84-87 Corvette KYBs do fit, I guess any shock made for that generation of 'Vette would also work.
    2013 500C Abarth - Manual - Bianco exterior - Rosso/nero leather interior
    Neu-F short shift adapter | Eurocompulsion V3 intake | Sprint air filter | Eurocompulsion ram air elbow | Eurocompulsion boost leak fix kit | Alfa Romeo 4C ignition coils | GFB DV+ diverter valve | 500T Black-trimmed tail lights | Energy rear bumpstops | Zonkered rear stock springs | KYB rear Corvette shocks | 25mm Corsa Forza Performance rear torsion bar | Corsa Forza Performance lower subframe brace

  2. #32
    Junior Member VisualKei's Avatar
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    The KYBs are only $25 apiece so I ordered a pair of those, knowing they have been proven to work. I also ended up ordering up a set of Bilstein B8's for the Z51 suspension package for $50 each, to experiment with. The B8's are a hint shorter and stiffer, specifically matched to the shorter, stiffer springs used on the Z51 suspension package for that specific generation of Corvette that the KYBs are used on. If I'm going to use aftermarket springs that drop the rear end a bit, the valving on the B8's -might- perform a bit better than the KYBs. I'll find out soon!
    2015 Nero Abarth, manual gearbox, base model
    Play-hard parts: EC V4.1, DNA lateral braces, DNA subframe brace, GFB DV+, Alfa Romeo 4C coils, ATM FMIC, EC 695TF/P2, OZ Alleggerita 16x7, 205/45R16 Conti ExtremeContact Sport
    Misc parts: Braille B2015, AAD AOS, Wink rally mirror, Scangauge II, PTP blanket, Ecliptech Shift P2+, Defi boost gauge, H3R 2.5lb halon.
    Next purchase:Koni yellow rears, Vogtland springs.

  3. #33
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    Just did them today, perfect fit and did them with a set of lowering springs in the rear to level the car a bit. Not as low as I was expecting but still better than stock

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawk02 View Post
    Just did them today, perfect fit and did them with a set of lowering springs in the rear to level the car a bit. Not as low as I was expecting but still better than stock

    Which springs did you use?
    2013 500C Abarth - Manual - Bianco exterior - Rosso/nero leather interior
    Neu-F short shift adapter | Eurocompulsion V3 intake | Sprint air filter | Eurocompulsion ram air elbow | Eurocompulsion boost leak fix kit | Alfa Romeo 4C ignition coils | GFB DV+ diverter valve | 500T Black-trimmed tail lights | Energy rear bumpstops | Zonkered rear stock springs | KYB rear Corvette shocks | 25mm Corsa Forza Performance rear torsion bar | Corsa Forza Performance lower subframe brace

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  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo L. View Post
    Which springs did you use?
    A pair of used Stage1 500Madness ones, actually didn't lower it as much as I thought it would, Maybe an inch at most.

  7. #36
    Lifetime Member Southernroadrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawk02 View Post
    Just did them today, perfect fit and did them with a set of lowering springs in the rear to level the car a bit. Not as low as I was expecting but still better than stock
    You can take the stock isolator out and replace them with the thinner ones our vendors sell. You gain another half inch or so.
    2017 Abarth (Celeste Blu)

    !!! ROLL TIDE !!!!

  8. #37
    Junior Member VisualKei's Avatar
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    Going with Bilstein B8's ended up working fine in my application. I replaced the rubber isolator with the polyurethane one but didn't notice any difference. The poly ones might be a hint thinner, but the stock rubber ones are softer, have crenelations on the ends for more squishiness, and squish down under load anyhow so my guess is it doesn't make a huge difference. I only had a pair on hand so I couldn't change out all four (tops and bottoms of each).

    I'm too lazy to rewrite everything, so I'll copy/paste a previous writeup I wrote elsewhere:

    I just installed a set of Vogtland springs today, Energy poly bumpstops, Energy poly spring isolators (one set, installed at the top. Reused OEM rubber one on bottom of spring), and Bilstein B8's.


    People have been doing the budget KYB Gas-A-Just KG5564 rear shock install for a while now. The original application is for the 1984-1987 Corvette without the Z51 suspension package (lowered sport suspension). The KYBs about 3/8" shorter than the stock Abarth shock absorber. For $25 each on Amazon Prime, it's a bargain to improve the factory shocks. It's not going to approach purpose-specific high end street/strip shocks, but it's an improvement over OEM.


    Bilstein B8's are the same as their B6 line in design principle--improved sport handling shocks over OEM (Bilstein B4 are OEM direct replacements), but the B8 is slightly shorter and revalved to deal with lowering springs to allow proper spring pretension on the vehicle, while the B6 is meant for installation with OEM-height springs. It's not going to approach Bilstein's higher-end B12/B14/B16/Clubsport stuff by any stretch of the imagination, but it's an improvement over OEM. They aren't much more expensive than the KYB at $50 each on Amazon.


    The caveat of this install is one needs to use reducer bushings (a number of them) to shim the eyelet holes down. The bottom eyelets on the shocks require two 16mm OD x 12mm ID x 20mm long oilite bronze or oiless steel, two each (for a total of four). The commonly used one cited for this job is available on Amazon, Dayton 3FJU sleeve bearings. The top eyelets require 12mm OD x 10mm ID x 10mm long bushings in oilite bronze or oiless steel, four each (for a total of eight). Amazon sells these as well. The 16mm shock eyelet should be a gentle press-fit but the 12.1mm eyelet is slightly oversized, so make sure you don't lose your smaller bushings when you're moving stuff around during the install.


    By way of comparison, the following are measured Abarth shock lengths:
    OEM (used): 14.75" eye-to-eye
    KYB Gas-A-Just KG5564 14.375" eye-to-eye
    Bilstein B8 24-184588 13.75" eye-to-eye
    The Bilstein B8 is a full inch shorter than the OEM Abarth, and mildly shorter than the KYB shock meant for a stock corvette without the Z51.


    The ground-to-fender-arch of the car, for those concerned about lowering aesthetics:
    front: 24.5"
    rear: 25.5" (before)
    rear: 24.375" (after)
    Difference: 1.125" drop in rear (Vogtlands advertised as 1.25 or 1.4" rear drop, so very close)


    Energy poly spring isolators are about 1/8" thinner than the OEM rubber, though I have a feeling when you drop the car down, the squish of the OEM rubber puts them at the same height as the thinner-but-stiffer poly units, so I don't think these played any role in changing ride height. If I planned better, I would have ordered two sets and gotten rid of the second set of rubber isolators, but I am not sophisticated enough to tell if these even make any difference.


    Energy poly bumpstops are simple to install. OEM bump stops on top just pop out. Energy units install on the bottom of the spring cup. The 8mm (roughly 5/16") hole on the bottom of the spring cup needs to be drilled out to 3/8".


    Ride quality: I haven't done a bunch of twisties to see how it compares, but the rear feels more settled, with less roll during jerks or sweepy turns. I was executing emergency braking to break in my rotors/pads last week and the rear end would get squirrely in a straight line from the weight transfer. It still does it with the new suspension components in the rear, but it's less pronounced and doesn't feel like it nose dives as rapidly. The rear feels mildly stiffer and settles quicker when I do an informal push or jumping test on the rear of the car with the hatch open


    I haven't remotely had the chance to experience threshold braking while approaching a turn or play with trail braking dyanamics. I also don't have enough skill to allow me to to get into these situations, or the experience to judge the dynamics of the vehicle in such situations. I guess ultimately, I changed some parts and it "feels better" but in a way I can't quantify. It's possibly some part placebo and some part real.


    Easy to do. 15mm socket at 52lbft for the top shock mount, E18 socket at 74lbft for the bottom shock mount (I don't know the 12pt socket workaround size, I have an E-torx set laying around). Plenty of room. Minor drilling or enlargening of an existing hole. It took longer to lift the vehicle and dismount/mount the wheels than the actual shock/spring and bumpstop install. Used a jack on the rear beam to get the right height to get the bottom shock eyelet lined up.


    This was a relatively cheap experiment, all things considered. $100 for rear shocks, $150 for springs (coupon code), and $25 for bumpstops and spring isolators, so just under $275. I haven't installed the front springs yet, not sure if I want to do it because of the hassle of removing struts and compressing springs, and I don't know if I feel the need to lower the front. I just wanted the rear to feel more confident and I wasn't ready to commit to something like the Bilstein B14 coilover set.
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    2015 Nero Abarth, manual gearbox, base model
    Play-hard parts: EC V4.1, DNA lateral braces, DNA subframe brace, GFB DV+, Alfa Romeo 4C coils, ATM FMIC, EC 695TF/P2, OZ Alleggerita 16x7, 205/45R16 Conti ExtremeContact Sport
    Misc parts: Braille B2015, AAD AOS, Wink rally mirror, Scangauge II, PTP blanket, Ecliptech Shift P2+, Defi boost gauge, H3R 2.5lb halon.
    Next purchase:Koni yellow rears, Vogtland springs.

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  10. #38
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    Great writeup! If you ever do the fronts, do the same. Removing the strut from the car seems a bit tricky because you have to hold the shocks shaft in place while removing the cup washer's retaining bolt.
    2013 500C Abarth - Manual - Bianco exterior - Rosso/nero leather interior
    Neu-F short shift adapter | Eurocompulsion V3 intake | Sprint air filter | Eurocompulsion ram air elbow | Eurocompulsion boost leak fix kit | Alfa Romeo 4C ignition coils | GFB DV+ diverter valve | 500T Black-trimmed tail lights | Energy rear bumpstops | Zonkered rear stock springs | KYB rear Corvette shocks | 25mm Corsa Forza Performance rear torsion bar | Corsa Forza Performance lower subframe brace

  11. #39
    Member Pilothall's Avatar
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    I agree, good write-up! I've been waiting to hear your results since you said you were going to try it. I might try the Bilsteins out if/when I get lowering springs. Thanks!

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