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Thread: How To: Evaporative Re-Route and Boost Leak Fix

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    Senior Member Ryephile's Avatar
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    How To: Evaporative Re-Route and Boost Leak Fix

    After 60 pages of fleshing out what the boost leak is, what blocking it does, and how to fix it without angering the ECU program parameters, here's the full monty:

    *The stock evaporative emissions setup is designed such that the car purges fuel vapors from the charcoal canister in two fashions; 1) most commonly while running the engine within turbo-boost, and 2) while the engine is at lower load in vacuum operation. In order to correctly purge the vapors in both scenarios, a split plumbing is required where one outlet is at the turbo compressor inlet and one is in the intake manifold behind the throttle body. Fiat decided to take a strange design twist on their plumbing to the turbo compressor inlet, and implemented a venturi T fitting and use boost pressure to force vapors through a complicated section of line. This solution creates a boost leak and unnecessary vapor restriction, and is in my opinion a sub-optimal evaporative emission solution on top of unusual versus the rest of the automotive industries' solution.

    *I'm going to gloss over the variety of concepts all of us tried to solve the problem of fixing the boost leak while not creating a Check Engine Light (CEL) scenario. CEL's will occur when specific evaporative emission parameters aren't occurring as the Engine Control Unit (ECU) is expecting based on its sensor readings. These aren't necessarily an indication of a performance problem per se, but could also demonstrate the relatively narrow range of programmed behavior the ECU is expecting. It was my goal to find the operational endpoints of the ECU's evaporative emission strategy while also fixing the boost leak to improve drivability performance and pull the turbo compressor map away from the choke line during high power operation.

    Dare I quote myself from the Free horsepower? thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryephile View Post
    Like dart1.4t said, you need both check valves to accommodate broadband Evap functionality during the two basic engine operational circumstances; boost and vacuum.

    If you can picture it, the Evap line is a Y, one inlet, two outlets. Each outlet needs its own check valve. I'll try to explain it for everyone.
    *The inlet is from the purge valve [the small cylinder thingie]. This flows the gasoline vapors from the charcoal canister from the gas tank.
    *One outlet goes to the turbo inlet. This outlet flows vapors when the engine is running boost. The check valve is needed conversely when the engine is running vacuum to prevent a vacuum leak.
    *The other outlet goes to the intake manifold. This outlet flows vapors when the engine is running vacuum. The check valve is needed conversely when the engine is running boost to prevent a boost leak and also pressurizing the charcoal canister.

    Both check valves create a contained system that allows purge flow in all operational circumstance, but no cross contamination of boost or vacuum, sort to speak.
    *The obvious first step is to block the boost leak. This is a line running from the driver-side boost tube exiting the intercoolers and headed towards the throttle body. This line needs to be capped and clamped to avoid leaking during the Abarth's ~18 PSI of boost at full throttle. This can be done with a simple rubber cap available from any local auto parts store and a 1/4"-5/8" worm clamp to keep it in place.

    *The next step is to take out the evaporative emission lines that are causing the problem and install the new lines. Here's a diagram that shows what needs to be happen. Essentially, the line with two "X"s goes underneath the intake manifold and then up to the Venturi T needs to be cut out, with a rubber cap on the leftover T at the left-side "X" mark. The small loop in red is reusing the original 3/8" hose U-shape. The green dot is where you re-use the factory check valve embedded within the "X"'d out line. The long red line is where you plumb into the turbo compressor inlet line.




    *Here is a Bill of Materials (BOM) that Shaggie put the link together that shows what needs to be ordered. Keep in mind some of this may be available in single quantities at your local auto parts or hardware store. Don't order a pack of 10 unless you really really love extras!

    http://www.mcmaster.com/order/rcvRte...407&lnktyp=lnk


    *Here is the video I put together that hopefully shows what is tough to explain in text:



    The result should speak for itself during the 1st test drive. Part throttle actuation has greater resolution and control, and boost builds exactly as your foot commands instead of being erratic and over-reacting. You may also get an extra HP or two, but I haven't verified that, it's just theory. You should not get any CEL's, but this is not a guarantee as I cannot account for individual vehicle tolerances.

    Here's a datalog plot I did that shows part throttle pedal versus MAP through casual 2nd and 3rd gear acceleration. Note smooth correlation between foot movement and boost changes. Not erratic at all.



    I also have hours of datalogs that show the vapor pressure is similar to stock with this hardware configuration, so I'm confident the evaporative emission system is operating in a safe and predictable fashion very consistent with the OEM plumbing but exchanging the boost leak for low restriction emission line routing.

    Cheers and I hope everyone finds this helpful,
    Ryan
    Last edited by Ryephile; 05-29-2013 at 11:21 PM.

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    Super Moderator Tweak's Avatar
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    Sticky worthy and so it is...nice work.

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    Senior Member 808Abarth's Avatar
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    wow amazing write up!! Quality on this forum for sure!!
    1982 Toyota Supra, 2013 Fiat Abarth
    1982 Toyota Celica Supra Thread

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    Senior Member Ryephile's Avatar
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    Tiny update: As more people do this I'm getting some feedback. Some cars have gone >10k miles with no codes pending. Other cars have gone as little as 100 miles and have posted a CEL. I can't account for variances in installation, so assuming they're all correct it's possible the ECU is sensitive yet there is some production tolerance at play.

    What I can say for certain is the code most prevalent is P1CEA, and despite the workshop manual description, is posting during 0% commanded purge. This tells me the workshop manual is not telling the whole story, or the proverbial intern haphazardly rushed out the Evap calibration (curiously common). From my datalogging, a correctly implemented Evap re-route has slightly better vapor flow than the stock configuration with the boost leak. This slight improvement in flow is likely the source of the false positive CEL some cars are getting.

    Put simply, it works better than stock but the ECU isn't programmed to tolerate that. Moving forward, I still stand by this fix as it significantly improves the part-throttle drivability, and IMO it's worth the risk of having the CEL, especially knowing it's a false positive.

    I hope that helps,
    Ryan

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    Senior Member lillo24's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryephile View Post
    After 60 pages of fleshing out what the boost leak is, what blocking it does, and how to fix it without angering the ECU program parameters, here's the full monty:

    *The stock evaporative emissions setup is designed such that the car purges fuel vapors from the charcoal canister in two fashions; 1) most commonly while running the engine within turbo-boost, and 2) while the engine is at lower load in vacuum operation. In order to correctly purge the vapors in both scenarios, a split plumbing is required where one outlet is at the turbo compressor inlet and one is in the intake manifold behind the throttle body. Fiat decided to take a strange design twist on their plumbing to the turbo compressor inlet, and implemented a venturi T fitting and use boost pressure to force vapors through a complicated section of line. This solution creates a boost leak and unnecessary vapor restriction, and is in my opinion a sub-optimal evaporative emission solution on top of unusual versus the rest of the automotive industries' solution.

    *I'm going to gloss over the variety of concepts all of us tried to solve the problem of fixing the boost leak while not creating a Check Engine Light (CEL) scenario. CEL's will occur when specific evaporative emission parameters aren't occurring as the Engine Control Unit (ECU) is expecting based on its sensor readings. These aren't necessarily an indication of a performance problem per se, but could also demonstrate the relatively narrow range of programmed behavior the ECU is expecting. It was my goal to find the operational endpoints of the ECU's evaporative emission strategy while also fixing the boost leak to improve drivability performance and pull the turbo compressor map away from the choke line during high power operation.

    Dare I quote myself from the Free horsepower? thread:



    *The obvious first step is to block the boost leak. This is a line running from the driver-side boost tube exiting the intercoolers and headed towards the throttle body. This line needs to be capped and clamped to avoid leaking during the Abarth's ~18 PSI of boost at full throttle. This can be done with a simple rubber cap available from any local auto parts store and a 1/4"-5/8" worm clamp to keep it in place.

    *The next step is to take out the evaporative emission lines that are causing the problem and install the new lines. Here's a diagram that shows what needs to be happen. Essentially, the line with two "X"s goes underneath the intake manifold and then up to the Venturi T needs to be cut out, with a rubber cap on the leftover T at the left-side "X" mark. The small loop in red is reusing the original 3/8" hose U-shape. The green dot is where you re-use the factory check valve embedded within the "X"'d out line. The long red line is where you plumb into the turbo compressor inlet line.




    *Here is a Bill of Materials (BOM) that Shaggie put the link together that shows what needs to be ordered. Keep in mind some of this may be available in single quantities at your local auto parts or hardware store. Don't order a pack of 10 unless you really really love extras!

    http://www.mcmaster.com/order/rcvRte...407&lnktyp=lnk


    *Here is the video I put together that hopefully shows what is tough to explain in text:



    The result should speak for itself during the 1st test drive. Part throttle actuation has greater resolution and control, and boost builds exactly as your foot commands instead of being erratic and over-reacting. You may also get an extra HP or two, but I haven't verified that, it's just theory. You should not get any CEL's, but this is not a guarantee as I cannot account for individual vehicle tolerances.

    Here's a datalog plot I did that shows part throttle pedal versus MAP through casual 2nd and 3rd gear acceleration. Note smooth correlation between foot movement and boost changes. Not erratic at all.



    I also have hours of datalogs that show the vapor pressure is similar to stock with this hardware configuration, so I'm confident the evaporative emission system is operating in a safe and predictable fashion very consistent with the OEM plumbing but exchanging the boost leak for low restriction emission line routing.

    Cheers and I hope everyone finds this helpful,
    Ryan


    nice lotus exige s!! love that car...

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    Senior Member musicsurf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryephile View Post
    Tiny update: As more people do this I'm getting some feedback. Some cars have gone >10k miles with no codes pending. Other cars have gone as little as 100 miles and have posted a CEL. I can't account for variances in installation, so assuming they're all correct it's possible the ECU is sensitive yet there is some production tolerance at play.

    What I can say for certain is the code most prevalent is P1CEA, and despite the workshop manual description, is posting during 0% commanded purge. This tells me the workshop manual is not telling the whole story, or the proverbial intern haphazardly rushed out the Evap calibration (curiously common). From my datalogging, a correctly implemented Evap re-route has slightly better vapor flow than the stock configuration with the boost leak. This slight improvement in flow is likely the source of the false positive CEL some cars are getting.

    Put simply, it works better than stock but the ECU isn't programmed to tolerate that. Moving forward, I still stand by this fix as it significantly improves the part-throttle drivability, and IMO it's worth the risk of having the CEL, especially knowing it's a false positive.

    I hope that helps,
    Ryan
    There is a TCB for the P1CEA code. They have also added the P0456 code as well.
    Michael
    All Angles Design
    cell - 352.262.6071

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    Senior Member DesmosDromos's Avatar
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    Ryephile, first, thanks for this! I read most of the free horsepower thread with interest and appreciate your dedication to the community in developing what seems to be the best solution to the boost leak while still allowing evap purge.

    I set out to do this mod over the weekend after reading and watching the video many times. The thing I'm still struggling with is how hard it is to see behind the motor to figure out where I need to cut and cap. Do you have some close ups of the finished solution you could post? I understand what I need to cut/cap and why, but I can't see where those lines terminate back there and doing it blind seems like a bad idea.

    In your diagram it's mostly the X on the right that concerns me as i figure I can pull the T on the left and cap at the bottom.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by DesmosDromos; 10-30-2013 at 11:02 AM.
    EVERY drive is an epic drive in an Abarth!

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    Senior Member doadea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesmosDromos View Post
    Ryephile, first, thanks for this! I read most of the free horsepower thread with interest and appreciate your dedication to the community in developing what seems to be the best solution to the boost leak while still allowing evap purge.

    I set out to do this mod over the weekend after reading and watching the video many times. The thing I'm still struggling with is how hard it is to see behind the motor to figure out where I need to cut and cap. Do you have some close ups of the finished solution you could post? I understand what I need to cut/cap and why, but I can't see where those lines terminate back there and doing it blind seems like a bad idea.

    In your diagram it's mostly the X on the right that concerns me as i figure I can pull the T on the left and cap at the bottom.

    Thanks!

    I am getting ready to do this mod as well, I have all the parts. I second Desmos Request.
    2012 Fiat 500 Abarth 1.4T (Nero) Delivered 6/5/2012
    2010 Nissan Rouge SL AWD
    *See My Garage For List Of Mods*

    **JUNE 2014 FIAT OF THE MONTH**
    Youtube account with Videos of my Abarth:
    https://www.youtube.com/doadea

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    Senior Member Ryephile's Avatar
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    Most of the line you remove (the two "X"s in the diagram) is totally blind and underneath the intake manifold. I agree it's not easy. In the diagram, you end up capping the driver-side "X". It's the only unused opening once you remove the stock line, it becomes obvious once you're in there doing it.

    In the video, what gets cut and left out of the car is at 0:15, and the new that goes back in the car is at 1:15. Hopefully that helps.

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    Senior Member DesmosDromos's Avatar
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    Thanks for the prompt reply. Maybe I'll stick my iphone or GoPro back there and take a couple pics so I have a better idea. If so, I'll post them. So are the lines to be removed just friction fit on a barb connector such that I can just yank em out and then feel around for where to cap?
    EVERY drive is an epic drive in an Abarth!

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