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Fiat500USA
12-12-2011, 02:11 AM
Fiat500USA.com Has Just Posted the Following:



More... (http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Fiat500USA/~3/ZNRteCneShA/fiat-500-nhtsa-crash-test.html)

sportbiker
12-12-2011, 02:30 AM
This doesn't sound right:

In the NHTSA's frontal tests, cars are crashed into a solid barrier at 35 mph, representing a head-on collision of two cars of similar size and weight each moving at 35 mph.

Car moving 35 mph impacting a stationary object is a head-on crash at 35 mph. Car moving 35 mph impacting a car moving in the opposite direction at 35 mph is a head-on crash at 70 mph. Are you sure you want to say they're the same?

Fiat500USA
12-12-2011, 02:45 AM
This doesn't sound right:


Car moving 35 mph impacting a stationary object is a head-on crash at 35 mph. Car moving 35 mph impacting a car moving in the opposite direction at 35 mph is a head-on crash at 70 mph. Are you sure you want to say they're the same?

I know, it didn't sound correct, however I got that from their site and here is another government source:

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05370.pdf

"The full frontal crash test is the equivalent of two identical vehicles, both
traveling at 35 mph, crashing into each other head-on. The test vehicle is
attached to a cable and towed along a track at 35 mph so that the entire
front end of the vehicle engages a fixed rigid barrier, as shown in figure 4.
This type of crash test produces high level occupant deceleration, making
this test demanding of the vehicle’s restraint system.

Figure 4: Full Frontal Crash Test Conducted under NCAP
Click the following link to watch a video of a full frontal crash test
conducted by NHTSA NCAP at 35 mph:
http://www.gao.gov/media/video/d05370v1.mpg

Because the full frontal crash test is equivalent to two identical vehicles
moving toward each other at 35 mph, the crash test results can only be
compared to other vehicles in the same class and with a weight that is plus
or minus 250 pounds of the test vehicle. The test protocols for the full
frontal NCAP test are the same as the full frontal belted test in the Federal
Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, with the exception of the test speed—the
NCAP test is conducted at 35 mph, 5 mph faster than the standard test.

Fiat500USA
12-12-2011, 02:55 AM
I know, it didn't sound correct, however I got that from their site and here is another government source:

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05370.pdf

"The full frontal crash test is the equivalent of two identical vehicles, both
traveling at 35 mph, crashing into each other head-on. The test vehicle is
attached to a cable and towed along a track at 35 mph so that the entire
front end of the vehicle engages a fixed rigid barrier, as shown in figure 4.
This type of crash test produces high level occupant deceleration, making
this test demanding of the vehicle’s restraint system.

Figure 4: Full Frontal Crash Test Conducted under NCAP
Click the following link to watch a video of a full frontal crash test
conducted by NHTSA NCAP at 35 mph:
http://www.gao.gov/media/video/d05370v1.mpg

Because the full frontal crash test is equivalent to two identical vehicles
moving toward each other at 35 mph, the crash test results can only be
compared to other vehicles in the same class and with a weight that is plus
or minus 250 pounds of the test vehicle. The test protocols for the full
frontal NCAP test are the same as the full frontal belted test in the Federal
Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, with the exception of the test speed—the
NCAP test is conducted at 35 mph, 5 mph faster than the standard test.

Here it is a NHTSA brochure:

http://www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/reports/810552.pdf

In the frontal crash test, new cars and light
trucks are crashed head-on into a fixed
barrier to approximate a head-on collision
between two identical vehicles each moving
toward the other at 35 mph. Comparisons
for frontal impact ratings are meaningful
only when made between vehicles of the
same type (passenger cars, vans, etc.) and
within a similar weight range (within 250
pounds of each other).
In the side-impact crash test, a moving...

Felnus
12-12-2011, 07:42 AM
It is correct. Also, "Mythbusters" did a show where the crashed a car into a barrier and then two identical cars head on into each other and the damage to the cars was the same in both tests.

I should have waited until I read the blog post. I gots quoted lol

I also have to say I stand corrected on the passenger seat position. It seems NHTSA protocol requires the passenger seat to be as close to the dash as possible in its fore and aft travel. Which flys in the face of every single recommendation I've ever seen regarding safety in cars equipped with airbags. I grabbed a quick quote from the internet that sums up the basic rules to keep an airbag from killing you:

Adult Safety Points

Everyone should buckle up with both lap and shoulder belts on every trip. Air bags are supplemental protection devices.
The lap belt should be worn under the abdomen and low across the hips. The shoulder portion should come over the collar bone away from the neck and cross over the breast bone.

The shoulder belt in most new cars can be adjusted on the side pillar to improve fit.

Driver and front passenger seats should be moved as far back as practical, particularly for shorter statured people.

Fiat500USA
12-12-2011, 10:34 AM
It is correct. Also, "Mythbusters" did a show where the crashed a car into a barrier and then two identical cars head on into each other and the damage to the cars was the same in both tests.

I should have waited until I read the blog post. I gots quoted lol

I also have to say I stand corrected on the passenger seat position. It seems NHTSA protocol requires the passenger seat to be as close to the dash as possible in its fore and aft travel. Which flys in the face of every single recommendation I've ever seen regarding safety in cars equipped with airbags. I grabbed a quick quote from the internet that sums up the basic rules to keep an airbag from killing you:

Adult Safety Points

Everyone should buckle up with both lap and shoulder belts on every trip. Air bags are supplemental protection devices.
The lap belt should be worn under the abdomen and low across the hips. The shoulder portion should come over the collar bone away from the neck and cross over the breast bone.

The shoulder belt in most new cars can be adjusted on the side pillar to improve fit.

Driver and front passenger seats should be moved as far back as practical, particularly for shorter statured people.

That was a great post that really captured the whole question about the test. Thanks! I couldn't resist quoting it. LOL

How they test is how they test, not much we can do about it other than question why. Hopefully it was done in a diligent, fair way. The seating position doesn't make much sense but I haven't studied that document. It points to the problem of what may look acceptable in a clinical, laboratory type environment, but in the real world just would not happen. No one would sit like that even with a tall person sitting behind them. They would switch seats with them, etc.

VTEC Mini
12-12-2011, 12:51 PM
It is correct. Also, "Mythbusters" did a show where the crashed a car into a barrier and then two identical cars head on into each other and the damage to the cars was the same in both tests.

I should have waited until I read the blog post. I gots quoted lol

I also have to say I stand corrected on the passenger seat position. It seems NHTSA protocol requires the passenger seat to be as close to the dash as possible in its fore and aft travel. Which flys in the face of every single recommendation I've ever seen regarding safety in cars equipped with airbags. I grabbed a quick quote from the internet that sums up the basic rules to keep an airbag from killing you:

Adult Safety Points

Everyone should buckle up with both lap and shoulder belts on every trip. Air bags are supplemental protection devices.
The lap belt should be worn under the abdomen and low across the hips. The shoulder portion should come over the collar bone away from the neck and cross over the breast bone.

The shoulder belt in most new cars can be adjusted on the side pillar to improve fit.

Driver and front passenger seats should be moved as far back as practical, particularly for shorter statured people.I saw this episode too. I was surprised by the results.

Chris
12-12-2011, 04:45 PM
Newton's Third law of Motion: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mythbusters-mythssion-control/

sportbiker
12-12-2011, 07:37 PM
Newton's Third law of Motion: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mythbusters-mythssion-control/

I just now tried that link in three different browsers but couldn't get any of the videos to play. I think it's a conspiracy.

Felnus
12-12-2011, 07:49 PM
I'm loving this one. From NHTSA's own website. http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Shoppers/Air+Bags/General+FAQ

10.With advanced frontal air bags, do I still need to maintain 10 inches between the air bag cover and my breastbone?

Yes. To minimize the potential of any air bag-related injury, NHTSA still recommends keeping a 10-inch minimum between the air bag cover (in the center of the steering wheel for drivers and on the dashboard for the right front passenger), maintaining a proper seating position, and moving the seat as far back as possible (drivers should be able to comfortably reach the pedals.)


But yet we are going to test vehicles with seats as close to the dash as possible in an improper seating position just to show how dangerous that is, not to show you how safe a vehicle is when used properly. /sarcasm.