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ASHFIAT
11-12-2016, 07:20 PM
My new X has just under 2900 mi. on it, mostly suburban driving. When new, the oil level was even with the top of the hatched area on the stick, now the level is half way down the hatched area.
Checking conditions were consistent. Not since my AR 2.5 V6 days have I owned a car that swallowed this much oil.
How does this compare with other observations?
Steve

5port
11-12-2016, 07:33 PM
My new X has just under 2900 mi. on it, mostly suburban driving. When new, the oil level was even with the top of the hatched area on the stick, now the level is half way down the hatched area.
Checking conditions were consistent. Not since my AR 2.5 V6 days have I owned a car that swallowed this much oil.
How does this compare with other observations?
Steve

Steve I'm with you as far as keeping an eye on oil consumption. Between 0 miles and 2K I consumed (and added) 1 quart of 0W-20. This was over time and added in small top ups at each level check. After the 2K mark it was like someone thru a switch and now its down to nil. I'm at 2600 miles and it really is not a concern now and seems normal. Heavy oil consumption first couple thousand OK as long as it trails off over time. Also how you drive during break-in has something to do with it.

Fiat500USA
11-13-2016, 01:38 AM
My new X has just under 2900 mi. on it, mostly suburban driving. When new, the oil level was even with the top of the hatched area on the stick, now the level is half way down the hatched area.
Checking conditions were consistent. Not since my AR 2.5 V6 days have I owned a car that swallowed this much oil.
How does this compare with other observations?
Steve


Hi Steve, welcome to the forum. 1/2 a quart in 2900 miles is really not excessive. Like 5port mentions, new cars can use some oil, but having said that 1/2 a quart in 2900 miles or extrapolating, 1 quart in 5800 miles is fine. The Alfa 2.5 oil consumption spec is 1 quart per 1,000 miles so we're well off of that, thank goodness!

PLP
11-14-2016, 10:06 AM
Ours at 3000 miles is about half the range. I am not sure how much actually was there to start with, but for the last 1000 miles I did not notice any significant drop.

PLP
12-19-2016, 11:07 AM
4600 miles and it is the the minimum mark.
That is a bit much I would say. Especially for a new engine that is only I4, 2.4.

I will be changing oil this week, so I will keep an eye on the consumption now. I am not sure how much was it to begin with.

pkgmsu2000
01-05-2017, 05:16 PM
4600 miles and it is the the minimum mark.
That is a bit much I would say. Especially for a new engine that is only I4, 2.4.

I will be changing oil this week, so I will keep an eye on the consumption now. I am not sure how much was it to begin with.

the 2.4L multi-air engine in the Dodge Dart EATS oil excessively, and many dart owners have resolved to using catch cans as well

davevoss
01-19-2017, 01:25 PM
4600 miles and it is the the minimum mark.
That is a bit much I would say. Especially for a new engine that is only I4, 2.4.


Oil consumption during the break-in period is not unusual, and not all engines (even of the same type) will consume the same amount during that period. It should, however, stabilize after the break-in period, say sometime after the first oil change. At around 32k miles, my 2.4L engine consumes about 1/2 quart between oil changes, which I've been doing at ~8k mile intervals.

PLP
01-19-2017, 02:34 PM
So, after the firs oil change that took place at about 4500 miles, the engine does not seem to consume oil at all. We have put almost 4000 miles since then and I would say the oil level barely moved at all. I poured 0W-20 Mobil1.

ASHFIAT
02-01-2017, 05:42 PM
After 5500 mi. the oil consumption has slowed greatly; obviously the engine just needed a few more miles to seat in.
I am very happy with this car, especially the interior and control functions.

Bluex
02-27-2017, 08:00 PM
I am having the opposite in oil consumption as it adds miles to the odometer. At 17,600 miles it is using a quart ever 2500 miles. No engine leaks or white smoke when it starts. Feel like I am driving my fathers 1972 F100 all over again.:Mad:

Bringing to dealer next week to replace ALL engine mounts due to vibration throughout car especially when the engine is cold and will add this issue to the list.

PLP
02-28-2017, 10:00 AM
I am having the opposite in oil consumption as it adds miles to the odometer. At 17,600 miles it is using a quart ever 2500 miles. No engine leaks or white smoke when it starts. Feel like I am driving my fathers 1972 F100 all over again.:Mad:

Bringing to dealer next week to replace ALL engine mounts due to vibration throughout car especially when the engine is cold and will add this issue to the list.


What oil did you use?
I put Mobil1 0W-20.

Engine mounts - I feel pretty strong vibration on cold days. More than I thought was initially...

Bluex
02-28-2017, 11:16 PM
Been using synthetic Castroil or Mobil 1 since first oil change. In regards to the engine mounts they were designed for 2017 and the new mounts are smooth as glass. A TSB came out on 2/22/17 instructing dealers to replace with new style if customers complain. Just notified today it will be 10 - 14 days until the new parts arrive.

PLP
03-23-2018, 09:39 AM
My update on oil

About 8 months ago, or almost 5000 miles ago oil change was done and oil was topped.
I added oil to the max mark. Checked today (I was checking it from time to time) and it is below minimum.

I am not sure how much it takes to fill from min to max, but this much use worries me. (I would estimate 1 quart per 3000 miles?)
My service advisor mentioned that FCA would OK use of oil up to 1 quart per 1000 miles. That is sick.

Never had a car that being below 100k miles mark would eat this much oil.

streetsurfer
03-23-2018, 10:03 AM
If not happy with your consumption rate, it can help to prepare yourself with knowledge of all the possible causes before trying to address it through a service department.

https://www.amsoil.com/techservicesbulletin/MotorOil/TSB%20MO-2004-04-03%20Oil%20Consumption.pdf

Fiat500USA
03-23-2018, 10:29 AM
This may help figure out what's happening with the oil. In my experience, cars under 10,000 miles or so can use more oil.

Engine Oil Consumption Guideline applies to all 2012-2016 FCA US LLC vehicles equipped with gasoline engines.

Engines require oil to lubricate and protect the load bearing and internal moving parts from wear including cylinder walls, pistons and piston rings. When a piston moves down its cylinder, a thin film of oil is left on the cylinder wall. During the power stroke, part of this oil layer is consumed in the combustion process. Varying rates of oil consumption are accepted as normal in all engines.

Oil Consumption
**The accepted rate of oil consumption for engines used in the vehicles listed above is 1 quart (0.946 liter) in 2,000 miles (3,200 km) for the 1st 50,000 miles (80,467 km). For vehicles with more then 50,000 miles (80,467 km) the acceptable oil consumption for engines is 1 quart (0.946 liter) in 750 miles (1,207 km).**

CAUTION: This above rate only applies to personal use vehicles, under warranty, that are driven in a non-aggressive manner and maintained in
accordance with the appropriate maintenance schedule.

CAUTION: This rate does not apply to vehicles that are driven in an aggressive manner, at high RPM, high speeds, or in a loaded condition (for trucks).

There are many factors that can affect a Owner's concern with oil consumption. Driving habits and vehicle maintenance vary from owner to owner. Inspect each condition listed below prior to determining if the vehicle in question has abnormal engine oil consumption.

Diagnosis of Oil Consumption:

Gasket and External Leaks
Thoroughly inspect the oil pan and engine intake manifold for leakage due to over tightened, damaged, or out of place gaskets.

Oil Leaks
Inspect all oil lines and fittings for signs of leakage. Verify oil filter is at proper torque and oil filter gasket is not out of place.

Improper Reading of the Oil Level Indicator on Dipstick
Verify that the dipstick is fully seated in the tube. Verify the dipstick tube is fully seated in the engine block. When checking the oil level, make sure the vehicle is on a level surface and the dipstick is wiped clean before taking an oil level reading and fully depress the dipstick until the shoulder bottoms out on the dipstick tube.

NOTE: The dipstick must be the proper part number for the engine/vehicle that is
being checked.

CAUTION: **Operating the vehicle with an oil level that is below the minimum level indicated on the engine oil dipstick can result in severe engine damage.
Repairs resulting from operating an engine with insufficient oil are not covered under the terms of the New Vehicle Limited Warranties.**

Some engines require more time than others for the oil to drain back into the crankcase. The vehicle should be allowed to sit for a minimum 15 minutes, after the engine has been shut off, before taking an oil level reading. To ensure an accurate reading, the temperature of the oil should be close to the same temperature as the previous time the oil level was checked.

Under or Over Oil Fill after an Oil Change
After an oil change, verify that the proper amount of oil was put in the engine and that the oil level on the dipstick is not above the full mark or below the add marks. Refer to the Owner Manual or Service Information for information on recommended oil quantity.

Correct Oil Type
Verify the vehicle has the correct oil. Refer to the Owner Manual or Service Information for information on recommended oil viscosity and quality.

Crankcase Ventilation System
Verify that the Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system is operating properly. Blockages, restrictions or damage to the PCV system can result in increased oil use.

Oil Dilution (Fuel and Water)
On vehicles that are normally driven short distances, less than 5 miles (8 km), especially in colder weather, unburned fuel and condensation generated from cold engine operation may not get hot enough to evaporate out of the oil. When this occurs, the dipstick may indicate that the oil level is over-full. Subsequent driving on a trip of sufficient length to enable normal engine operating temperature for 30 minutes or more, in order to vaporize excess moisture and fuel, may give the customer the impression of excessive oil consumption.

Causes for Oil Consumption:

Aggressive Driving
Aggressive driving and/or continuous driving at high speeds with high RPM's will increase oil consumption. Because this may not always be an everyday occurrence, it is hard to determine exactly how much the oil economy will be affected. A higher rate of oil consumption is normal for vehicles equipped with manual transmissions that are driven aggressively. Aggressive means; operation at high RPM (3,000 RPM to redline), with frequent use of engine braking (using the engine to slow the vehicle). Vehicles that are driven aggressively may consume engine oil at a rate of up to 0.946 L (1 quart) every 805 km (500 mi). This is normal for a vehicle that is driven aggressively. No repair is necessary.

This driving habit will require the owner to check the engine oil level at frequent intervals, to verify the oil level remains within the recommended operating range. Oil level should be checked every time you get fuel.

Towing or Heavy Usage
Towing a trailer will increase oil consumption and may cause oil consumption to fall below the normal accepted rate referenced in this bulletin for an unloaded vehicle in a personal use application. Large frontal area trailers will further increase the work required from the engine, especially at highway speeds increasing the rate of oil consumption.

Engine Wear
Piston scuffing, excessive piston-to-wall clearance, tapered or out of round cylinders, worn, damaged or improperly installed valve guides, seals and piston rings will cause an increase in oil consumption.

Engine Temperature
If an engine is ran at overheated temperatures for more than brief periods, oil will oxidize at a faster than normal rate. In addition, gaskets may distort, piston rings may stick and excessive wear may result. Verify that all cooling system components are in proper working order.

courtesy of FCA

PLP
03-23-2018, 01:23 PM
If not happy with your consumption rate, it can help to prepare yourself with knowledge of all the possible causes before trying to address it through a service department.

thanks for educational links and info.
I checked around the engine to look for any signs of problems. Not even one.
As for wear inside - I cannot tell. I mean, I can scope it using the small camera I have... maybe you are onto something, as it does not really have the power other 500X's we have driven.


This may help figure out what's happening with the oil. In my experience, cars under 10,000 miles or so can use more oil.

That's what I thought.
Initially it was high, then looked like was better (the second oil change), but this time looks like it is back and at a higher rate, as even the initial oil was not this quick to be gone.

I admit, we got the car "new", like never registered, but with 2000 miles (yes, 2k). Maybe it was driven too hard when new?

PLP
03-26-2018, 10:11 AM
So I refilled oil.
It needed over 3.5 quarts to get to the full mark.

And that was 5000 miles, that puts me at 1400 miles per quart.
Oil used is Pennzoil Platinum, 0W-20.
Not aggressive driving. Maybe once in a while open it up to 5000 rpm, most of the time within 3000 rpm.

davevoss
03-27-2018, 12:58 PM
As an alternate point of reference, I have ~67k miles on my 500X with 2.4L engine, and oil consumption is only about 1/4 quart between oil changes, which I've been doing at 7-8k intervals, always using 0W-20 full synthetic. Getting an accurate starting point with which to monitor the oil level over time is critical, and maybe not everyone takes the time, but here's what I do. After draining the oil and replacing the oil filter, I intentionally fill a little less than the correct amount of oil, run the engine for a minute or so to let the new oil filter fill up, and then let the engine sit off for about an hour. Then, I check the oil level and carefully add until the level is at the 'full' mark on the dipstick. That way, I know the level won't drop right away due to a partially filled oil filter, or rise from not letting the oil drain back to the pan.

PLP
03-28-2018, 09:59 AM
I know what you mean.
I get the dealer to change oil.
After the change, I check it once I get back home (well, initially I check if there is enough the moment they return my car).
Then top it off, if needed.

So that would give me a good starting point, just like you suggested.

carfreak09
03-28-2018, 07:17 PM
So I refilled oil.
It needed over 3.5 quarts to get to the full mark.

And that was 5000 miles, that puts me at 1400 miles per quart.
Oil used is Pennzoil Platinum, 0W-20.
Not aggressive driving. Maybe once in a while open it up to 5000 rpm, most of the time within 3000 rpm.

My god...it only had 1 quart of oil in it?! That can't be right! Were the lifters extra noisy? I'd be concerned that your engine was damaged if it only had 1 quart of oil in it.

Strangely, the 1.4 turbo, which is known to burn some oil, has always stayed full in my X.

PLP
03-29-2018, 09:34 AM
My god...it only had 1 quart of oil in it?! That can't be right! Were the lifters extra noisy? I'd be concerned that your engine was damaged if it only had 1 quart of oil in it.

Strangely, the 1.4 turbo, which is known to burn some oil, has always stayed full in my X.

Nope, it was all quiet.
Oil capacity for 2.4 is 5.5 quarts.
Yet still I am surprised it took this much. According to the manual 1 quart should take minimum level to the max.
However, after adding one quart I reached the low end. It took 2.5 quarts to get to the max...
And I checked yesterday night, after it was driven, and the level was full, so I did not overfilled it as I thought I could have.

It is weird car... something is weird with engine. I mean, it was not using oil at all for like 3000 miles, all of sudden it was gone? And no - it is not dripping. Not that I can see. C'mon 3 liters of oil is quite easy to spot, right?

ASHFIAT
09-04-2018, 07:48 PM
After starting this thread two years ago my 2.4 X has gone approx 33k; the oil has been changed five times, twice by the dealer to establish a relationship, and thereafter by me using 0-20 Ultra Platinum Pennzoil. After about six months the consumption dropped dramatically to a rate that I think I could safely go my normal change interval of 6k without dropping below the hatch on the stick. (I am a confessed oil nut that adds oil by the cup, not quart, so I never let the oil level approach the bottom of the stick). I am puzzled and disheartened by stories of FIAT problems, and especially oil burning. I have nothing to offer but my own experience. If you are curious about oil quality you might search the net for a blog that tests motor oils; choose one that deals with tests and actual numbers, not one that has opinions and anecdotal stories.

PLP
09-05-2018, 09:42 AM
I use 0W-20 Pennzoil Platinum as well.
Oil consumption at about over 1 quart per 5000 miles with currently being at 18'000 miles.
In addition - I noticed constant drop in coolant level that has been present since the first day. Initially I blamed the air locks or some kind of "expansion", but now I am starting worrying. It drops from max to min within about 3000 miles.
System holds pressure, no leaks visible - that leaves me with 3 scenarios: leaking on hot parts and evaporates (but I do not smell anything), evaporation through the cap (a bit excessive IMO), and finally being burned through the head gasket (although no air bubbles can be seen).
Sorry for digression.

Oh, per my friend at the dealer FCA says 1 quart per 1000 miles is OK. No action needed. Yes, 1 quart per 1'000 miles.
That is 2 whole 5-quart jugs per oil change... insane.

davevoss
09-05-2018, 12:48 PM
I am puzzled and disheartened by stories of FIAT problems, and especially oil burning.

I'm puzzled too, at owner's stories of excessive oil consumption, and of dealer's stating that 1 quart per 1000 miles is acceptable, as that sure seems excessive to me. I have over 80k miles on my 500X with 2.4L engine, and it only consumes about 1/3 quart of oil between oil changes, which I'm typically doing at 7~8k mile intervals. Since new, I've been mindful to not abuse the engine, by driving gently while it is warming up, by not making a habit of rapid acceleration, etc. and I've always used 0W-20 full synthetic oil, not always the same brand, though I do avoid Pennzoil as I've noticed (in other cars I've owned) that consumption is often a lot higher. Those 80k miles are a mix of in-town, backroad, and highway/freeway, some with just me in the car, some while fully loaded, and some while flat towing other cars or loaded trailers, and so I figure if the engine was going to consume more oil than it should, it would have by now. In the past, it was recommended that engines be operated in a certain way while new to ensure proper break-in, however it seems that these days there is very little discussion about that, and many dealers skip discussing that as well, however it is actually pretty important to ensure long service life, whether or not the owner's manual mentions it. Of the cases where oil consumption is excessive, I wonder how many are due to piston rings that didn't properly seat during initial break-in.

Fiat500USA
09-05-2018, 04:05 PM
The 1gt per 1000 miles has been an industry standard for many decades. The current FCA guideline is actually pretty lenient as car companies go at least in the first 50,000 miles (1gt per 2000 miles). Our 500X needed a quart of oil within the first 10,000 miles (towards the beginning) and then I may have added 1/2 gt within the next 15,000 miles. My Abarth has 49K on it, gets oil changes between 4 and 8k and I've added maybe less than 2 quarts the within this time. The first quart added was very early on. I think a quart between oil changes, while annoying, is an acceptable rate, especially with these long drain intervals and a hard working engine.

The repost below has some interesting information in it, especially concerning oil dilution and when to check, etc. That may explain some dipstick level variations.



This may help figure out what's happening with the oil. In my experience, cars under 10,000 miles or so can use more oil.

Engine Oil Consumption Guideline applies to all 2012-2016 FCA US LLC vehicles equipped with gasoline engines.

Engines require oil to lubricate and protect the load bearing and internal moving parts from wear including cylinder walls, pistons and piston rings. When a piston moves down its cylinder, a thin film of oil is left on the cylinder wall. During the power stroke, part of this oil layer is consumed in the combustion process. Varying rates of oil consumption are accepted as normal in all engines.

Oil Consumption
**The accepted rate of oil consumption for engines used in the vehicles listed above is 1 quart (0.946 liter) in 2,000 miles (3,200 km) for the 1st 50,000 miles (80,467 km). For vehicles with more then 50,000 miles (80,467 km) the acceptable oil consumption for engines is 1 quart (0.946 liter) in 750 miles (1,207 km).**

CAUTION: This above rate only applies to personal use vehicles, under warranty, that are driven in a non-aggressive manner and maintained in
accordance with the appropriate maintenance schedule.

CAUTION: This rate does not apply to vehicles that are driven in an aggressive manner, at high RPM, high speeds, or in a loaded condition (for trucks).

There are many factors that can affect a Owner's concern with oil consumption. Driving habits and vehicle maintenance vary from owner to owner. Inspect each condition listed below prior to determining if the vehicle in question has abnormal engine oil consumption.

Diagnosis of Oil Consumption:

Gasket and External Leaks
Thoroughly inspect the oil pan and engine intake manifold for leakage due to over tightened, damaged, or out of place gaskets.

Oil Leaks
Inspect all oil lines and fittings for signs of leakage. Verify oil filter is at proper torque and oil filter gasket is not out of place.

Improper Reading of the Oil Level Indicator on Dipstick
Verify that the dipstick is fully seated in the tube. Verify the dipstick tube is fully seated in the engine block. When checking the oil level, make sure the vehicle is on a level surface and the dipstick is wiped clean before taking an oil level reading and fully depress the dipstick until the shoulder bottoms out on the dipstick tube.

NOTE: The dipstick must be the proper part number for the engine/vehicle that is
being checked.

CAUTION: **Operating the vehicle with an oil level that is below the minimum level indicated on the engine oil dipstick can result in severe engine damage.
Repairs resulting from operating an engine with insufficient oil are not covered under the terms of the New Vehicle Limited Warranties.**

Some engines require more time than others for the oil to drain back into the crankcase. The vehicle should be allowed to sit for a minimum 15 minutes, after the engine has been shut off, before taking an oil level reading. To ensure an accurate reading, the temperature of the oil should be close to the same temperature as the previous time the oil level was checked.

Under or Over Oil Fill after an Oil Change
After an oil change, verify that the proper amount of oil was put in the engine and that the oil level on the dipstick is not above the full mark or below the add marks. Refer to the Owner Manual or Service Information for information on recommended oil quantity.

Correct Oil Type
Verify the vehicle has the correct oil. Refer to the Owner Manual or Service Information for information on recommended oil viscosity and quality.

Crankcase Ventilation System
Verify that the Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system is operating properly. Blockages, restrictions or damage to the PCV system can result in increased oil use.

Oil Dilution (Fuel and Water)
On vehicles that are normally driven short distances, less than 5 miles (8 km), especially in colder weather, unburned fuel and condensation generated from cold engine operation may not get hot enough to evaporate out of the oil. When this occurs, the dipstick may indicate that the oil level is over-full. Subsequent driving on a trip of sufficient length to enable normal engine operating temperature for 30 minutes or more, in order to vaporize excess moisture and fuel, may give the customer the impression of excessive oil consumption.

Causes for Oil Consumption:

Aggressive Driving
Aggressive driving and/or continuous driving at high speeds with high RPM's will increase oil consumption. Because this may not always be an everyday occurrence, it is hard to determine exactly how much the oil economy will be affected. A higher rate of oil consumption is normal for vehicles equipped with manual transmissions that are driven aggressively. Aggressive means; operation at high RPM (3,000 RPM to redline), with frequent use of engine braking (using the engine to slow the vehicle). Vehicles that are driven aggressively may consume engine oil at a rate of up to 0.946 L (1 quart) every 805 km (500 mi). This is normal for a vehicle that is driven aggressively. No repair is necessary.

This driving habit will require the owner to check the engine oil level at frequent intervals, to verify the oil level remains within the recommended operating range. Oil level should be checked every time you get fuel.

Towing or Heavy Usage
Towing a trailer will increase oil consumption and may cause oil consumption to fall below the normal accepted rate referenced in this bulletin for an unloaded vehicle in a personal use application. Large frontal area trailers will further increase the work required from the engine, especially at highway speeds increasing the rate of oil consumption.

Engine Wear
Piston scuffing, excessive piston-to-wall clearance, tapered or out of round cylinders, worn, damaged or improperly installed valve guides, seals and piston rings will cause an increase in oil consumption.

Engine Temperature
If an engine is ran at overheated temperatures for more than brief periods, oil will oxidize at a faster than normal rate. In addition, gaskets may distort, piston rings may stick and excessive wear may result. Verify that all cooling system components are in proper working order.

courtesy of FCA

carfreak09
12-07-2018, 06:54 PM
Just as a warning to those with the 2.4...my roomie has a 2015 Jeep Cherokee with the same 2.4/9 speed auto as the 500X. He's currently at around 57-58k. Just this week, 2 days in a row his car stalled while trying to do a left hand u-turn and flashed a message on screen saying "shift to park to start". When he shifted to park and attempted to restart, the engine was very sluggish to catch and took a few tries. Scared him to death. Upon investigating, I'd heard of similar issues and they pointed to oil level being low. Apparently, the 2.4 has a sensor that will stall the engine if the level gets too low. So I asked him how long it's been since he had oil change and he said it's been 7k and he was about to get one. He always takes it to the dealer and has always used synthetic so he can go longer between changes. Anyway, I checked his dipstick and it barely registered on the very tip of it! I put in about 1 and 3/4 of a quart and it's still an inch below the thatched area. Since he's getting an oil change real soon and doesn't plan to drive anywhere, I didn't fill it up further, just enough to keep engine damage from occurring. So In 7k, his engine burned roughly 3-4 quarts of oil! That's insane to me as the car isn't abused. The 2.4 is definitely not meant to be owned by those who don't check the oil regularly.

So if your 2.4X stalls inexplicably while making a sharp turn, check the oil level immediately!

SeaDawg
12-07-2018, 09:41 PM
Sorry, but my personal opinion is there is NO reason not to check the oil level at LEAST once every other fill-up with gas. My 500 NON-turbo and my CX5 both use synthetic oil and neither indicate they use oil and I STILL check them at least every other fillup.

Fiat500USA
12-08-2018, 12:34 AM
So he doesn't check his oil?? Wow, that is skating on thin ice. Like Seadawg says, checking the oil every other fuel fill up is good advice. Technically, the industry standard is you are suppose to check it every fill up. Once you get the feel for the engine's usage, going longer makes some sense, and the every other fillup interval sounds reasonable. But whatever you do, you don't want to go too long and get caught out with low oil. That is the quickest way to damage an engine.

I would bet 95% of the engine problems people report here were caused by not checking the oil regularly and continuously running the engine without enough oil. MultiAir is sensitive to dirty and / or low oil pressure and that will give misfires or worse. For an engine to stall because of low oil is pretty bad. That means there was some kind of pressure or volume issue.

If he doesn't check his oil regularly, your friends engine has also likely run low on oil before, too, which in turn makes it even more prone to use oil between changes now. He should not run that engine at all if it is not in the safe range. Hopefully he gets into the habit of checking it regularly and hopefully the engine hasn't been damaged. Fingers crossed for him.

carfreak09
12-08-2018, 06:13 PM
So he doesn't check his oil?? Wow, that is skating on thin ice. Like Seadawg says, checking the oil every other fuel fill up is good advice. Technically, the industry standard is you are suppose to check it every fill up. Once you get the feel for the engine's usage, going longer makes some sense, and the every other fillup interval sounds reasonable. But whatever you do, you don't want to go too long and get caught out with low oil. That is the quickest way to damage an engine.

I would bet 95% of the engine problems people report here were caused by not checking the oil regularly and continuously running the engine without enough oil. MultiAir is sensitive to dirty and / or low oil pressure and that will give misfires or worse. For an engine to stall because of low oil is pretty bad. That means there was some kind of pressure or volume issue.

If he doesn't check his oil regularly, your friends engine has also likely run low on oil before, too, which in turn makes it even more prone to use oil between changes now. He should not run that engine at all if it is not in the safe range. Hopefully he gets into the habit of checking it regularly and hopefully the engine hasn't been damaged. Fingers crossed for him.

Sadly, he's one of the majority that looks at a car as transportation, nothing more, and sees no need to check things unless it fails or a notification pops up. Car enthusiasts like me will never understand that point of view. However, I think it's reasonable for someone to assume an engine should hold the majority of its oil, barring an obvious leak, between oil changes. The amount of oil he lost was shocking and there are no leaks. I don't get why this 2.4 engine has a tendency to burn oil. Reminds me of the weak valve guide seals on previous 2.4 engine designs from Mitsubishi (which this one is related to) but at least those let you know they burned oil with the puffs of smoke when first starting them. This engine gives no indication of its appetite.

Fiat500USA
12-08-2018, 06:58 PM
Agreed. Most folks don't think about checking oil. I see it every day. New cars need so little maintenance compared to the old days, that it is out of sight, out of mind. Some things still need to be done, but many don't think about it. Now with all these extended oil change intervals, checking the oil is even more critical 'cause of the amount of miles being racked up.

One quart of oil in 2,000 miles is not unheard of depending on conditions. That could change, too, so maybe that will slow down for your friend. The other thing is the oil gets taxed more and gets diluted with moisture, etc. so that can accelerate consumption. I bet if the oil is maintained at a reasonable level, the consumption will be back to a more reasonable rate between changes.

As for the 2.4 using more oil, I don't know. I think there is many variables including driving conditions. In the ~25-30,000 miles we put on ours, I put in not more than a quart and a half, and I only changed the oil when the indicator came on at around 10K miles. I've maybe added 2 quarts of oil total in the 50,000 miles on my Abarth, too. That I change around 4K - 5K miles a year. One time I was a whole quart down around the 10K mark and that surprised me, but it hasn't done that since. Probably attributed to how I was driving at that point. Could have even been finally breaking in at that time.

PLP
12-10-2018, 11:13 AM
I also suffer from high oil consumption.
Between changes I drift from full (max line) to about minimum in the mid run (say about 3000 miles). Refill - that is 2 quarts, and same for the remaining 3000-4000 miles until the OIL CHANGE indicator comes on.
None of my cars that I have ever owned would use this much oil, except those that had over 100k miles, but still not so bad.

I use 0W-20 (as specs) Pennzoil Platinum from the very first change. Only once for the whole period "only" 3 quarts were consumed.

I do not agree that this level of consumption is justified.
I would agree that owner should check oil from time to time (each fill up is a bit too often for a relatively new car without any LEAKS or other problems) and refill as needed, but with other cars that do not require oil tops off - 2.4 tigershark is a something like going back in time.

Even mine 1.6T GDI in KIA that I push quite hard so many times does not need this much oil (running 5W-30 same brand).

ASHFIAT
02-19-2019, 09:05 PM
Any of us that are concerned about the oil consumption of our FIATs should google "consumer reports oil consumption article". The article won't change the behavior of your FIAT, but when you get to the list of the top 30 oil guzzlers you will have a big smile on your face.

PLP
02-20-2019, 04:35 PM
Hmm. That is weird.
2.0T is very common in VW/Audi family. Even Porsche uses it.
Yet, Audi was there, but not VW...

Yes, the article shows problems, but it does not really treat all participants equally.

You cannot compare NA-1.6 I4 to TT-4.8 V8. Not only turbo charged engines eat more oil by their nature, but 4.8 is 3 times bigger than 1.6. Hence, it has much more oil. Hence, 1 quart for it is nothing comparing to 1.6.


Going back to the topic.
It is weird - now the oil consumption stopped again. I am not sure. Is it weather related? Petrol? Style? I use same oil... that is same brand, grade. Different batch, though.

carfreak09
02-21-2019, 01:00 AM
Going back to the topic.
It is weird - now the oil consumption stopped again. I am not sure. Is it weather related? Petrol? Style? I use same oil... that is same brand, grade. Different batch, though.

Im sure it will start back up. Checked roomie's Cherokee again and she was a quart low. Not sure how many miles but it was basically after a round trip from Florida to Virginia so I'm guessing about 2-3k. Seems these engines should have a low oil level warning light for those that don't think to check it regularly.

5port
02-21-2019, 09:34 AM
There's a theory on the Dart boards that its the PCV valve stuck open. Once the PCV valve becomes unstuck and working again the oil consumption goes back to normal. Might be worth it to just replace it for $16.

https://parts.moparonlineparts.com/oem-parts/fiat-valve-pcv-5047063aa/?c=Zz1lbWlzc2lvbi1zeXN0ZW0mcz1lbWlzc2lvbi1zeXN0ZW0 maT0mcj0mYT1maWF0Jm89NTAweCZ5PTIwMTYmdD1lYXN5JmU9M i00bC1sNC1nYXM%3D

Teejay
03-10-2019, 04:00 PM
I have a 2018 500x Urbana 2.4L and had to add oil 3 times before I even hit 4,000 miles. Turns out there was a manufacturing defect in my engine where the cylinder heads were scored and now my car is in the shop waiting for it's new engine. I should have it back by the end of the week. I had a 2016 500x Easy that never burned a drop of oil, but from day 1 I used the 0-20w blend, not straight synthetic.