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77dino
08-15-2016, 06:04 PM
Here is my Spider on NC Hwy 181.

Sales@Tork
08-15-2016, 07:23 PM
sweet ride!!

Laz
08-15-2016, 07:31 PM
That is a beautiful car. I was thinking of buying the new one but I always had the itch of getting an old one. What are the main issues with them?

Klasse Act
08-15-2016, 07:33 PM
Great looking ride right there, the Miata well before the Miata was even thought of, LOL! Is that an oil pan I see hangin' down there?

Southernroadrunner
08-15-2016, 08:21 PM
Very nice car !!!!

77dino
08-15-2016, 08:25 PM
Yes, the oil pan hangs low on the old spiders! And of course I painted mine to be even more noticeable!!! J

Robert Nixon
08-15-2016, 08:53 PM
nice, glad to see it on the forum!

77dino
08-15-2016, 09:19 PM
Issues Hmmm where to start.... I purchased this car after I had owned a 1977 Ferrari 308gt4 Dino, so I have found this car incredibly cheap to maintain! There are great resources for parts and just about any mechanic can work on these cars if they can read a workshop manual! The bad news is that many of these cars have not been maintained well over the years because their value has been historically low. Also they can be a bit temperamental, like any classic car, so delayed maintenance has caught up with many cars over the years because they need to be tighten up here and there and run continually. Also they do not have some of our modern comforts like air conditioning and power steering.
What a classic 124 Fiat Spider offers is; they are great drivers cars and they give the driver the ability to really feel the road because they are truly a classic roadster. I have enjoyed this car and have driven it on many car tours and all over the mountains of NC where narrow winding roads rule the day, and this car loves them!

Doohickie
08-15-2016, 09:29 PM
Beauty.

Fiat500USA
08-15-2016, 11:29 PM
Beautiful car! Welcome to the forum and thanks for posting pics of your car. Like you were saying, I think now one of the major issues with an older Fiat, other than rust is having to deal with fixing 30- 40 years worth of other peoples botched mechanical repairs.

Andree
08-16-2016, 12:46 AM
Oooh! Thanks for the pics! Looks like a beautiful day to take out a beautiful car!

77dino
08-16-2016, 07:10 AM
Beautiful car! Welcome to the forum and thanks for posting pics of your car. Like you were saying, I think now one of the major issues with an older Fiat, other than rust is having to deal with fixing 30- 40 years worth of other peoples botched mechanical repairs.
It is funny what you find when you sort a car out... Rust is defiantly something to watch out for they tend to rust around the gas tank in the trunk and the seam in front of your feet through the bottom. The gas tank I understand where as the seam at your feet is a bit strange to me.

Fiat500USA
08-16-2016, 08:42 AM
Shock tower rust in the front, especially in the early cars, is also problem area. The crossmembers in the front can also loosen up.

The GM sourced airpump used in the mid 70s was a big contributor to Fiat getting a bad reputation. The pump could seize up when it got hot, and because it was driven by the timing belt, it would break the timing belt and the valves would bend. When a mechanic who wasn't aware of the problem would check the pump when it was cooled off, the pump would turn freely so they put everything back together only for it to happen again. It cost Fiat another $1,500 to fix it again. Thank you GM.

The first thing the shop I worked at would do when someone came in was to desmog the cars and junk the airpump among other things. You'd then have a great running reliable car. We'd also remember we'd get rid of the mixing thermostat and put in a conventional one. Changing to electronic ignition would also make a big difference, too.

Sammy124
08-16-2016, 07:14 PM
Shock tower rust in the front, especially in the early cars, is also problem area. The crossmembers in the front can also loosen up.

The GM sourced airpump used in the mid 70s was a big contributor to Fiat getting a bad reputation. The pump could seize up when it got hot, and because it was driven by the timing belt, it would break the timing belt and the valves would bend. When a mechanic who wasn't aware of the problem would check the pump when it was cooled off, the pump would turn freely so they put everything back together only for it to happen again. It cost Fiat another $1,500 to fix it again. Thank you GM.

The first thing the shop I worked at would do when someone came in was to desmog the cars and junk the airpump among other things. You'd then have a great running reliable car. We'd also remember we'd get rid of the mixing thermostat and put in a conventional one. Changing to electronic ignition would also make a big difference, too.

While I fully understand the ridiculousness of an air pump to "dilute" the hydrocarbons coming out the exhaust and how air pumps robbed power from the engine at no other gain other than do dilute exhaust gasses, how did your customers pass the biennial smog test, or was this in a state other than CA?

IIR, not only GM but all the domestics used these devices in the early years to pass tail pipe emissions. Today we get more power with better mileage AND reduced tailpipe emissions and depend on computer logic to do it and for the little boxes containing that logic to not fail.

Fiat500USA
08-16-2016, 11:48 PM
While I fully understand the ridiculousness of an air pump to "dilute" the hydrocarbons coming out the exhaust and how air pumps robbed power from the engine at no other gain other than do dilute exhaust gasses, how did your customers pass the biennial smog test, or was this in a state other than CA?

IIR, not only GM but all the domestics used these devices in the early years to pass tail pipe emissions. Today we get more power with better mileage AND reduced tailpipe emissions and depend on computer logic to do it and for the little boxes containing that logic to not fail.

This was in NY about 35 + years ago and, frankly, nobody really cared. It is probably safe to say most inspectors never saw a twin overhead cam engine before back then and didn't know what they were looking at. Besides, a great running European spec Fiat arguably put out less pollution than a poorly running smogged out Fiat. My Alfa GTV6 has headers, no cat, full euro exhaust, with hot cams, a Euro distributor and never had a problem getting inspected. Just not a big deal around here.

77dino
08-17-2016, 07:41 AM
Shock tower rust in the front, especially in the early cars, is also problem area. The crossmembers in the front can also loosen up.

The GM sourced airpump used in the mid 70s was a big contributor to Fiat getting a bad reputation. The pump could seize up when it got hot, and because it was driven by the timing belt, it would break the timing belt and the valves would bend. When a mechanic who wasn't aware of the problem would check the pump when it was cooled off, the pump would turn freely so they put everything back together only for it to happen again. It cost Fiat another $1,500 to fix it again. Thank you GM.

The first thing the shop I worked at would do when someone came in was to desmog the cars and junk the airpump among other things. You'd then have a great running reliable car. We'd also remember we'd get rid of the mixing thermostat and put in a conventional one. Changing to electronic ignition would also make a big difference, too.


The Shock tower is a big deal and easily viewed from the engine bay and with a flash light from underneath! And in my opinion everything loosens up and needs to be tightened periodically, I have found this on all of the classic cars that I have owned. MG, Fiat, Ferrari, Austin Healy, they all get loose somewhere with age… :)