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View Full Version : Worn Pads at 20,000?



araknd
05-02-2016, 04:17 PM
Looking for some information. Took the 2015 Abarth in for service (21,000 miles), needed oil change and wanted tire rotation (that's a different story). Anyway, when I was checking out, the service adviser told me that the front brakes needed to be replaced and that the rotors can not be turned, so I would have to pay for both rotors and pads. Is this normal behavior? What is the experience of other group members?

TIA.

Lance
2015 Abarth Auto (Vitaley)

stikman
05-02-2016, 07:52 PM
mine was completely warn out at 60,000 km (40K miles) almost down to the plate with 0.5 mm left.

Pad and rotor replaced together, original pad are hard on the rotor

Shawnb
05-02-2016, 08:30 PM
Mine were toast at 19k I believe.

Trunkout
05-02-2016, 09:23 PM
Do you people use your transmission for ANY braking? :)

Fiat500USA
05-02-2016, 09:44 PM
Do you people use your transmission for ANY braking? :)

Pads and rotors are a lot cheaper than a trans. gr_grin

Tweak
05-02-2016, 09:58 PM
With many trips to the mountains my rotors were worn well by 30K or so, pads had some life but I wanted better.

Robert Nixon
05-02-2016, 10:04 PM
That seems like really heavy wear for needing pads AND rotors at 20,000 miles. We all drive differently, but I've got 44,000 miles on mine with no issues, which includes a few years of autocross.

The other explanation is that the service guys make more money selling brakes and rotors, so I'd suggest having someone else take a look at the pads and rotors too.

Trunkout
05-02-2016, 11:57 PM
Pads and rotors are a lot cheaper than a trans. gr_grin

Kinda why I buy manuals! I can't imagine not having the assist!

Tiny Turbo
05-03-2016, 01:23 AM
Brakes are for braking. Transmissions are for making the wheels spin.

Anyways I'm nearing 20k on my Abarth and also need to service brakes soon.
What's really cheap but just as effective as stock brakes replacement option? (Pads and Rotors)

smark
05-03-2016, 06:11 PM
If you do a lot of mountain driving. You can prematurely wear out your brakes. Stop and go commuting, can kill life too. Your rotor's can be warp too. You driving habits. If you ride your brakes.

Just have them turn the rotor's, and a fresh pad change.

Why would anyone use their transmission to brake with. Brakes are a lot cheaper to replace. Then wearing out a clutch or transmission.

SeaDawg
05-03-2016, 07:53 PM
Do you people use your transmission for ANY braking? :)

I stopped doing that years ago when I had my '79 Trans Am. The clutch was really 'feather edged' in '87 when they had to pull the trans and bell housing because of a broken part in the manual clutch linkage. I took the advice that brakes were much less expensive than clutch/pressure plate replacements, haven't looked back.

Trunkout
05-04-2016, 12:33 AM
I stopped doing that years ago when I had my '79 Trans Am. The clutch was really 'feather edged' in '87 when they had to pull the trans and bell housing because of a broken part in the manual clutch linkage. I took the advice that brakes were much less expensive than clutch/pressure plate replacements, haven't looked back.

Cars have changed a bit since the invention of the computer.......

Tiny Turbo
05-04-2016, 01:03 AM
It's all really what you think smells better.
I personally like the smell of burnt brakes over roasted clutch. Roasted clutch smell gives me that cringy feeling and it lingers in the cabin longer.
:chuncky:

Fiat500USA
05-04-2016, 08:30 AM
I always heel/toe and normally downshift to be in the right gear when it is time to accelerate, or to help keep the car from overspeeding when going down hills/mountains. Most European cars we have here in this country have excellent brakes, so the days of downshifting to help braking isn't needed like in the old days.

Old school, overweight American cars with 4 wheel drum brakes, and cars or trucks with undersized brakes may benefit more from the downshift/slowdown technique, but it is generally not needed with a modern car. It's also possible to lock up a drive wheel, over-rev an engine or upset the chassis balance if the downshift isn't executed properly. The driving schools I've attended shunned the technique. Fiats, coming from Torino which is at the base of the Alps and Italy in general being a mountainous country, have traditionally had great brakes, too.

I find the best way to save brakes is with the accelerator pedal. Looking ahead, anticipating traffic /lights and releasing or moderating the accelerator so I don't have to jam on the brakes works best, plus it makes for a smoother more enjoyable drive. I rarely change brakes and have never worn out a clutch.

SeaDawg
05-05-2016, 01:14 AM
All three FIATs I have owned have felt so 'integrated' when braking. You always feel in control and the ultra linear response is great. When I drive my Mazda CX3, the car always feels like it is trying 'overrun' the brakes. The brakes are extremely good, but I am never able to stop as smoothly as I am when in a FIAT.

kitchbitch
05-10-2016, 06:32 AM
I brake with my transmission often and drive very sensibly and was shocked to be told that I needed new pads & rotors on my Pop 500 at 18,500. I've never had this happen with any other vehicle I've owned until the mileage was far greater.

Robert Nixon
05-10-2016, 11:09 AM
I don't know if it's normal for pads/rotors to have such different wear rates, even with many different driving styles.

One tip someone gave me once was to get your brakes done at one of the places that has a lifetime warranty, so that then if they keep wearing out with low mileage your next replacements will be under the store warranty.