PDA

View Full Version : MPG with ESC



Apk07
04-25-2014, 03:22 PM
I have no idea where I read it, but someone said something about fuel economy being better with ESC turned off... is there any value in that claim?

Ryephile
04-25-2014, 04:14 PM
I haven't heard that one before...and very unlikely to be true. The only change to buttons you push in the car affecting performance is the sport button. It adds a bunch more torque at WOT and also tempts you to burn more fuel by being more aggressively mapped with the pedal calibration. *edit* more torque on the turbo 500's

Feel free to do your own testing, but keep in mind that summer fuel is phasing in soon [if not already] and it has about 10% more energy per unit volume. Do you keep track of your fuel economy on Fuelly by chance?

tknospdr
04-25-2014, 04:26 PM
I have found that consistently running with ESC off adds about 1 to 2 MPG average to my fuel economy.

phade
04-25-2014, 05:47 PM
How could running with ESC off affect MPGs in any way what-so-ever? It only applies the brakes when there is wheel slippage detected, which the amount of throttle required to actually spin the wheels is what makes your MPGs drop. If you are not spinning the wheels, ESC is effectively off anyway. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

Ryephile
04-25-2014, 06:06 PM
It's really tough to know for sure without doing some very controlled testing, or getting an honest answer from the ECU calibrators.

Pushing buttons on the dash certainly affects our state of mind, so it could be as explainable as the driver wanting to get better FE, so they drive more efficiently. I know that when my fuel gauge starts reading low I definitely milk it for all its worth, LOL. Another possibility is the ECU calibrators hid a little Easter egg in the ECU and made the engine run more efficiently with ESC off. I'm skeptical of that, but it's not out of the question.

ophidia31
04-25-2014, 06:20 PM
I can see it increasing gas mileage (a little) if youre always in city driving. On the highway I wouldnt see there being any increase. With it off, the computer is free to do what it wants and sending all of that power to the wheels. With the traction on, even though wheels arent slipping/spinning, the ecm is still doing what it can to make sure that it doesnt happen. But then again, thats small increase in mileage can all be due to the driver. Good and bad days at work, other drivers on the road or what have you all play a role in your gas mileage.

dart1.4t
05-09-2014, 10:55 AM
for a claim of 1-2 mpg you have to do a lot of testing to be sur ethe numbers are relevant. that's like 3% (less that 3% for some drivers) in testing conditions that aren't really controlled. lots of room for error. but i guess i get pretty consistent miles per tank and 2 mpg could be 20miles per tank and that's about as much as my tanks seem to vary. so if i average that over 5-6 tanks and i don't see any significant outliers, and then try another way and also don't see any significant outliers over the same number of tanks and there is a 20 mile increase in the average i might be inclined to say there was a difference. but with concentration i can easily make up for that 20 miles and more so it doesn't rule out placebo effect.

doverosx
07-16-2014, 10:02 AM
I can see it increasing gas mileage (a little) if youre always in city driving. On the highway I wouldnt see there being any increase. With it off, the computer is free to do what it wants and sending all of that power to the wheels. With the traction on, even though wheels arent slipping/spinning, the ecm is still doing what it can to make sure that it doesnt happen. But then again, thats small increase in mileage can all be due to the driver. Good and bad days at work, other drivers on the road or what have you all play a role in your gas mileage.

That is bologna. The traction control is only engaged when the slip angle and wheel spin are outside of a predetermined threshold. ECUs are designed to engage traction management at about ~13% wheel spin, less so if the slip angle is higher and wheel spin is determined in a reactive nature (wheel speed sensor input). I forget the threshold that the braking force can be applied in the Abarth, but the torque vectoring works on one wheel....all to accelerate the car without adding more power....increasing efficiency. Driver slower, don't idle and don't tailgate; there's your mileage.

ophidia31
07-16-2014, 10:38 AM
Mmmmm, nope, its not. Last car I was able to disable traction control completely and saw better response and overall mileage. Amongst others who did this, they saw the same thing. But this ecu might be different as they all are from vehicle to vehicle.

edit: came off a bit wrong so i edited it