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View Full Version : Torque arm insert trimming info



lammie200
03-23-2014, 12:00 PM
I have been asked a few times via PM's about trimming the Neu-F insert. Here is what I know. Proceed at your own risk. Just kidding there is very little risk :)

The insert has a decent effect on responsiveness, but there are a few factors to consider. One is that an MT will behave differently than an AT. (I have an AT, btw.) All of the added vibration comes at idle or at very slow speeds. Vibration when moving or going faster than a few mph should disappear. You shouldn't notice any added vibration when you move past a few mph. It has to be worse on an AT because the tranny stays in gear when at a stop. Once you push the clutch in on an MT you shouldn't feel any added vibration at all. For some reason I have heard that people with MT's still feel that added vibration is excessive, but it seems to me that having an MT should allow you to mitigate the vibration via clutching. On my AT, there was nothing that I could do except trim the insert to get to the happy zone.

As far as trimming the insert goes this what I know: First the backing part of the insert is too thick. The ends of the center steel part of the torque arm should rest against the sheet metal pocket that it all fits up into the body mount. The thickness of the insert's backing prevents this and you will be tightening it all up with insert material binding up in the mount. It will squeak at slow speeds. So one thing to do is shave down the insert's backing so that the center steel of the torque arm is proud of the insert's backing surface. That is really the way the insert is supposed to fit because it is just supposed to fill the gaps in the original rubber insert. Binding it all up was not the intention for this piece. Trimming is a pain, but I put the insert in a vice and used an angle grinder to grind off material. You can't be too aggressive because the material tends to melt. But once you get all set up it isn't difficult to do.

The other trimming that I did was take material off the insert prongs themselves. I tried a full insert with just the backing trimmed, but there was still way too much vibration at idle. So I started trimming the prongs to allow for more movement, but not as much as leaving it out altogether. Trimming the prongs worked. No added vibration and a bit more responsiveness off the line and smoother shifting.

Hope this info helps. Like a lot of aftermarket parts that you need to modify make work, the insert is well worth the trouble if you trim it IMHO.

PS. I rounded the edges of the prongs a bit more than the photo shows. Also a razor blade or xacto knife worked well for trimming the prongs.

gundam2000
04-10-2014, 09:25 AM
I just trimmed mine with a hacksaw. really easy. I didnt trim any of the "pegs"
I havent put it in as I dont have an external torx to get the torque arm off.

lammie200
04-10-2014, 09:33 AM
I just trimmed mine with a hacksaw. really easy. I didnt trim any of the "pegs"
I havent put it in as I dont have an external torx to get the torque arm off.

If you have an MT you might be OK with the increased noise and vibration at idle because your drivetrain will be disengaged when you stop moving. Since AT's are in 1st gear at idle there was quite a bit of increased noise and vibration when the car is running but not moving. My experience anyway. That is why I trimmed the pegs. I just remembered that you have an AT. You might be putting it on and taking it off a couple of times to be satisfied. Good luck.

gundam2000
04-10-2014, 09:45 AM
I have a lift in the garage so its no biggie.
I agree that the backing plate part was way too thick.

lammie200
04-10-2014, 11:45 AM
...I agree that the backing plate part was way too thick.

I don't that anyone here as ever agreed with me before. I am going to play dice on the sidewalk at lunchtime today!SpinningSmiley