PDA

View Full Version : Generic Turbo Blanket- Downpipe Wrap install.



deathshead
07-08-2013, 10:13 PM
So I finally got around to installing my generic Amazon Turbo blanket today.
$51 bucks on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B51XJC4/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Very Simple install, All you have to do it pop off your heat shield top, and bracket.

Then, pop off the "Jesus Clip" off the wastegate arm. (YES I LOST IT GODDAMMIT!!,
But I ended up using a quality stainless steel mechanics wire to secure it, even better than the stock clip..)

Then stick the blanket over your turbine housing, you will see where you need to make a cut.
Get a sharp pair of scissors and cut a slot for the wastegate shaft. this stuff cuts easy with good scissors.

Next, stick your finger on the stud that sticks up for the bracket, get a razor blade and cut an X and then push the blanket over.

The blanket has small clips so you can use mechanics wire to secure the blanket but I didn't use any.
This is because its tight in there, I was able to just tuck the blanket in place its nice and snug,
Then reinstall your stock heat shield and bracket, this squishes the turbo blanket in place nice and secure.


This is a 15minute install but I discovered I had an exhaust leak at my turbo V-band. Shucks!
I had to unbolt the downpipe move it around a bit and crank the hell out of the V-band clamp bolt.
The stock Gasket is tissue paper thin a nice new thick gasket would have been nice...

Anyways. I then decided to wrap my catless downpipe.
I used DEI titanium via Amazon. It was around $20 Bucks.

This was a bit of a pain due to the fact that I was not pulling the downpipe out of the car
and when i installed it I installed the lower heat shield. you have to pull the dp to get that shield off.

So, I was able to wrap down a few inches past the O2 sensor, I then went underneath and wrapped the
Midpipe to keep heat away from the cold side plumbing.

Took the car out for a hard hour long run, 10 miles in you will see a little smoke as it breaks in.

Hour long run, stop and pop the hood and i'm noticing a ***HUGE*** improvement in underhood temps.



http://i40.tinypic.com/10e1mx5.jpg
http://i40.tinypic.com/2dr7ww9.jpg

808Abarth
07-08-2013, 11:33 PM
super nice install! i am wanting to do this also!! but worried about the extra heat the turbo is keeping and and longevity of the turbo itself. waiting to see more info. this car is so newwww! blahhhhhh

shagghie
07-09-2013, 12:35 AM
super nice install! i am wanting to do this also!! but worried about the extra heat the turbo is keeping and and longevity of the turbo itself. waiting to see more info. this car is so newwww! blahhhhhh

should help it last longer... will use the xtra heat to build boost quicker, at lower turbo rpm's, given added heat density.

ScorpionSkins.com
07-09-2013, 03:26 AM
should help it last longer... will use the xtra heat to build boost quicker, at lower turbo rpm's, given added heat density.

Won't it allow for oil coking to occur more easily? The built in auxiliary water pump is helpful but nowhere near as effective with heat dissipation as an after-run oil pump. Aren't you arguably trading one detrimental circumstance for another?

deathshead
07-09-2013, 09:38 PM
Won't it allow for oil coking to occur more easily? The built in auxiliary water pump is helpful but nowhere near as effective with heat dissipation as an after-run oil pump. Aren't you arguably trading one detrimental circumstance for another?

Shoudn't have ANY of these issues with a good Synthetic such as Rotella T, etc..

Watercooled with after run pump that our cars are equipped with is a huge plus too!

Abarth Phreak
07-10-2013, 12:24 AM
Won't it allow for oil coking to occur more easily? The built in auxiliary water pump is helpful but nowhere near as effective with heat dissipation as an after-run oil pump. Aren't you arguably trading one detrimental circumstance for another?

Just drive it correctly before shutting it off and you will never have an issue with coking the oil lines. If you are out racing and then immediately shut it down you need to get revoked anyway right? LOL. (Or get a turbo timer as many choose, which I think will allow the pump to continue even longer after it shutdown...right? Anyone install one and confirm...anyone???)

Abarth Phreak
07-10-2013, 12:27 AM
Not the prettiest of covers...but looks effective DH. Thanks for posting the pics!


So I finally got around to installing my generic Amazon Turbo blanket today.
$51 bucks on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B51XJC4/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Very Simple install, All you have to do it pop off your heat shield top, and bracket.

Then, pop off the "Jesus Clip" off the wastegate arm. (YES I LOST IT GODDAMMIT!!,
But I ended up using a quality stainless steel mechanics wire to secure it, even better than the stock clip..)

Then stick the blanket over your turbine housing, you will see where you need to make a cut.
Get a sharp pair of scissors and cut a slot for the wastegate shaft. this stuff cuts easy with good scissors.

Next, stick your finger on the stud that sticks up for the bracket, get a razor blade and cut an X and then push the blanket over.

The blanket has small clips so you can use mechanics wire to secure the blanket but I didn't use any.
This is because its tight in there, I was able to just tuck the blanket in place its nice and snug,
Then reinstall your stock heat shield and bracket, this squishes the turbo blanket in place nice and secure.


This is a 15minute install but I discovered I had an exhaust leak at my turbo V-band. Shucks!
I had to unbolt the downpipe move it around a bit and crank the hell out of the V-band clamp bolt.
The stock Gasket is tissue paper thin a nice new thick gasket would have been nice...

Anyways. I then decided to wrap my catless downpipe.
I used DEI titanium via Amazon. It was around $20 Bucks.

This was a bit of a pain due to the fact that I was not pulling the downpipe out of the car
and when i installed it I installed the lower heat shield. you have to pull the dp to get that shield off.

So, I was able to wrap down a few inches past the O2 sensor, I then went underneath and wrapped the
Midpipe to keep heat away from the cold side plumbing.

Took the car out for a hard hour long run, 10 miles in you will see a little smoke as it breaks in.

Hour long run, stop and pop the hood and i'm noticing a ***HUGE*** improvement in underhood temps.



http://i40.tinypic.com/10e1mx5.jpg
http://i40.tinypic.com/2dr7ww9.jpg

808Abarth
07-10-2013, 02:24 AM
hmmm really? damm. ok! i would think it would heat up a lot more and keep the heat in longer.. which i would think prevents a lot more ware.. but it does have a very efficient waterpump for the turbo. sooo ok! another one added to the list.

DS Ocampo
07-10-2013, 06:36 PM
Looks like a MUMMY..

Do u have a res or 100cel cat inline somewhere ??

deathshead
07-10-2013, 10:12 PM
Not the prettiest of covers...but looks effective DH. Thanks for posting the pics!

Very true ! You can only see a tiny bit of all this on the left hand side between the center cartridge since I run my stock heatshield cover.
The fact is we have a tiny turbo, and this was the smallest cover I could find, its a little big thats why is looks like that in the pictures.
but, its nice and snug with nothing holding it in except for just tucking the ends in a little bit and then the stock heat shield
squishes it on tight.

I just got back from a really nice "spirited" drive to pickup dinner before the restaurant closed.

Pulled in the driveway, got out, felt the front of the hood directly under the turbo,
ICE COLD, Now also lets not forget I'm not currently running the underhood insulation piece due to my
Assetto Corse hood vents.

Popped the hood and stuck my hands around under there, no real detectable heat over the stock heat shield as expected.

However, what IS still getting hot is that stupid Triangle shaped bracket that bolts onto the turbine,
This is because the stud for it is pressed directly into the turbine housing and it heat soaks the entire piece.
Need to figure out a way to isolate this...


I swear she pulls a bit harder! idk, placebo affect or what, but she just pulls and pulls up until fuel cut.
so now with all my current mods, the car and the way it pulls reminds me of a sportbike in a way.

DS Ocampo, Im currently still running the tmc catless dp, with a tiny tiny Vibrant resonator in the midpipe.
Im holding out for a good midpipe first then will try a 100cell cat in there. This should flow as good as open,still spit flames, and
I wont have any problems passing visual.

acrcpe45
07-12-2013, 04:14 PM
Just remember, holding all that heat into the cast iron and steel components isn't always a good thing. The steel will heat up and the iron will lose it's bond with the carbon molecules that make up the steel alloy. Eventually this will lead to cracks and brittle metal. Cast iron isn't perfectly pure, all the little stuff in the between the iron atoms will also bake out causing a higher chance for cracks.

Good luck, best bet is to take off the components and have them ceramic coated by reputable shop.

Mike

2Cool
07-12-2013, 05:03 PM
Just remember, holding all that heat into the cast iron and steel components isn't always a good thing. The steel will heat up and the iron will lose it's bond with the carbon molecules that make up the steel alloy. Eventually this will lead to cracks and brittle metal. Cast iron isn't perfectly pure, all the little stuff in the between the iron atoms will also bake out causing a higher chance for cracks.

Good luck, best bet is to take off the components and have them ceramic coated by reputable shop.

Mike

I disagree with that conjecture, based on both past experience with everything from old Grand Nationals to Evos, as well as information from the manufacturers themselves. It will not get hot enough to molecularly debond the cast iron, if it does than you have some much more serious issues to deal with... like fire. Magma hot fire. You are covering only the hot side of the turbo, so the center bearing and cool side both remain cooler, and our after run coolant pump will keep it from coking.

Here ya go:
http://www.ptpturboblankets.com/faqs.php
"Will a turbo blanket damage my turbocharger?

No. There is a misconception that the heat retained by the turbo blanket will cause damage to the turbocharger. This is not correct. Turbochargers are designed to handle well in excess of peak engine exhaust temperatures. Maintaining the heat of the exhaust within the turbocharger will not damage the turbocharger. However, as with all turbocharged vehicles, whether utilizing OEM or aftermarket turbochargers, it is very important to not shut off the engine directly after periods of heavy acceleration. It is advised by us, as well as all OEM and aftermarket turbocharger manufacturers, to allow a period of time to let the oil (and in some cases water) circulate and cool the turbocharger. We recommend that before shutting off the vehicle after periods of heavy acceleration, you should allow one to two minutes of idling to allow the turbocharger to cool down effectively. You may also consider purchasing a turbo timer to allow the engine to idle for a predetermined amount of time after you have left and locked your vehicle."

808Abarth
07-13-2013, 11:51 PM
I disagree with that conjecture, based on both past experience with everything from old Grand Nationals to Evos, as well as information from the manufacturers themselves. It will not get hot enough to molecularly debond the cast iron, if it does than you have some much more serious issues to deal with... like fire. Magma hot fire. You are covering only the hot side of the turbo, so the center bearing and cool side both remain cooler, and our after run coolant pump will keep it from coking.

Here ya go:
http://www.ptpturboblankets.com/faqs.php
"Will a turbo blanket damage my turbocharger?

No. There is a misconception that the heat retained by the turbo blanket will cause damage to the turbocharger. This is not correct. Turbochargers are designed to handle well in excess of peak engine exhaust temperatures. Maintaining the heat of the exhaust within the turbocharger will not damage the turbocharger. However, as with all turbocharged vehicles, whether utilizing OEM or aftermarket turbochargers, it is very important to not shut off the engine directly after periods of heavy acceleration. It is advised by us, as well as all OEM and aftermarket turbocharger manufacturers, to allow a period of time to let the oil (and in some cases water) circulate and cool the turbocharger. We recommend that before shutting off the vehicle after periods of heavy acceleration, you should allow one to two minutes of idling to allow the turbocharger to cool down effectively. You may also consider purchasing a turbo timer to allow the engine to idle for a predetermined amount of time after you have left and locked your vehicle."

bigclap:clap:

acrcpe45
07-15-2013, 11:54 AM
I disagree with that conjecture, based on both past experience with everything from old Grand Nationals to Evos, as well as information from the manufacturers themselves. It will not get hot enough to molecularly debond the cast iron, if it does than you have some much more serious issues to deal with... like fire. Magma hot fire. You are covering only the hot side of the turbo, so the center bearing and cool side both remain cooler, and our after run coolant pump will keep it from coking.

Here ya go:
http://www.ptpturboblankets.com/faqs.php
"Will a turbo blanket damage my turbocharger?

No. There is a misconception that the heat retained by the turbo blanket will cause damage to the turbocharger. This is not correct. Turbochargers are designed to handle well in excess of peak engine exhaust temperatures. Maintaining the heat of the exhaust within the turbocharger will not damage the turbocharger. However, as with all turbocharged vehicles, whether utilizing OEM or aftermarket turbochargers, it is very important to not shut off the engine directly after periods of heavy acceleration. It is advised by us, as well as all OEM and aftermarket turbocharger manufacturers, to allow a period of time to let the oil (and in some cases water) circulate and cool the turbocharger. We recommend that before shutting off the vehicle after periods of heavy acceleration, you should allow one to two minutes of idling to allow the turbocharger to cool down effectively. You may also consider purchasing a turbo timer to allow the engine to idle for a predetermined amount of time after you have left and locked your vehicle."

Conjecture? wow. Did I every specifically say the turbo? No I didn't, I was focusing more on the manifold and the downpipe, but you never asked, you simply assumed. I wasn't rude in my reply, I was simply making a suggestion and in my opinion wraps and blankets are simply temporary means to reduce heat. From my own experience I have seen down pipes, headers, and manifolds crack overtime as alloy slowly becomes more brittle. Ad a little moisture and... CRACK.

Carbon can begin to burn at 300 degrees farenheit. Yes, 300... that's not magma hot. After around 700 degrees farenheit all bets are off and you begin to change the grain structure of your iron alloy, but I'm sure you know that already, right? 700 degrees isn't liquid magma hot either, in fact it is pretty far from it.

Can you please explain grain structure and the affects of heat of the iron alloy piping used for exhaust or exhaust manifolds? Also explain to us why the factory uses a heat deflection shield and not an actual blanket (oh wait, I did that). Please explain the difference between cast iron and steel (carbon content specifically) and the melting points of each? Also explain how grain structure can lead to enhanced brittleness while you are at it, please.

I don't really give a crap if you want to wrap your exhaust and turbo with blankets or "asbestos" style wraps... I really don't care. I was simply trying to let people know that there CAN be issues assorted with using those products and that there are other options.

You can sit there and talk about experience with Grand Nationals all day long, but the reality is, these cars are designed around longevity/reliability and yes, blankets and wraps will affect the life of the components compared to OEM.

oh well, take care.

Mike

deathshead
07-15-2013, 08:01 PM
Conjecture? wow. Did I every specifically say the turbo? No I didn't, I was focusing more on the manifold and the downpipe, but you never asked, you simply assumed. I wasn't rude in my reply, I was simply making a suggestion and in my opinion wraps and blankets are simply temporary means to reduce heat. From my own experience I have seen down pipes, headers, and manifolds crack overtime as alloy slowly becomes more brittle. Ad a little moisture and... CRACK.

Carbon can begin to burn at 300 degrees farenheit. Yes, 300... that's not magma hot. After around 700 degrees farenheit all bets are off and you begin to change the grain structure of your iron alloy, but I'm sure you know that already, right? 700 degrees isn't liquid magma hot either, in fact it is pretty far from it.

Can you please explain grain structure and the affects of heat of the iron alloy piping used for exhaust or exhaust manifolds? Also explain to us why the factory uses a heat deflection shield and not an actual blanket (oh wait, I did that). Please explain the difference between cast iron and steel (carbon content specifically) and the melting points of each? Also explain how grain structure can lead to enhanced brittleness while you are at it, please.

I don't really give a crap if you want to wrap your exhaust and turbo with blankets or "asbestos" style wraps... I really don't care. I was simply trying to let people know that there CAN be issues assorted with using those products and that there are other options.

You can sit there and talk about experience with Grand Nationals all day long, but the reality is, these cars are designed around longevity/reliability and yes, blankets and wraps will affect the life of the components compared to OEM.

oh well, take care.

Mike


Hi Mike, Welcome to the forum.

Where are you getting your data from on this?

I havent been able to find any drawbacks of running a wrapped downpipe and or blanket.
In fact im seeing nothing but benefits.

Other than the obvious rust issues on non-stainless pipes when exposed to the elements, (which our cars are pretty clear of.)
and a chance of a fire if god for bid you were to lose an oil line but blanket or not a fire could happen if you
spray 30+psi of oil onto a hot turbo. lol

acrcpe45
07-15-2013, 08:19 PM
Hi Mike, Welcome to the forum.

Where are you getting your data from on this?

I havent been able to find any drawbacks of running a wrapped downpipe and or blanket.
In fact im seeing nothing but benefits.

Other than the obvious rust issues on non-stainless pipes when exposed to the elements, (which our cars are pretty clear of.)
and a chance of a fire if god for bid you were to lose an oil line but blanket or not a fire could happen if you
spray 30+psi of oil onto a hot turbo. lol

I am an engineer at a steel mill. I also race cars, karts, and been involved in several big money race cars.

Everything I am talking about won't happen over night. The longer the heat is sustained the faster the alloy can be damaged. I'd much rather spend the money on ceramic coatings than wrappings that are a pain in the arse. Heck the wrap itself gets brittle and falls apart in a relatively short amount of time. I will say that blanket style covers are better for headers/manifolds than wraps though. Blankets can look better, and the aluminized material does a good job of reducing ambient heat around a manifold... But it does nothing for performance. It generally is more consistent than a wrap which helps prevent hot spots compared to wraps. That doesn't mean I would use them though and they can still cause issues with alloys depending on how much heat is held in during the application.

Nearly all name brand header wraps have a disclaimer saying specifically NOT to use their product on cast iron manifolds because the heat cycling with the wrap can cause the manifold to crack and get brittle. The thin spot in the casting will be the first to crack. Same with exhaust pipes, over wrap or under wrap here or there and a hot spot will occur, then failure.

Then there are fires as you stated along with rust etc. To each there own though I guess... At the end of the day it is not my car. My big issue is with wraps, throw that junk in the garbage.

Mike

deathshead
07-15-2013, 11:03 PM
I am an engineer at a steel mill. I also race cars, karts, and been involved in several big money race cars.

Everything I am talking about won't happen over night. The longer the heat is sustained the faster the alloy can be damaged. I'd much rather spend the money on ceramic coatings than wrappings that are a pain in the arse. Heck the wrap itself gets brittle and falls apart in a relatively short amount of time. I will say that blanket style covers are better for headers/manifolds than wraps though. Blankets can look better, and the aluminized material does a good job of reducing ambient heat around a manifold... But it does nothing for performance. It generally is more consistent than a wrap which helps prevent hot spots compared to wraps. That doesn't mean I would use them though and they can still cause issues with alloys depending on how much heat is held in during the application.

Nearly all name brand header wraps have a disclaimer saying specifically NOT to use their product on cast iron manifolds because the heat cycling with the wrap can cause the manifold to crack and get brittle. The thin spot in the casting will be the first to crack. Same with exhaust pipes, over wrap or under wrap here or there and a hot spot will occur, then failure.

Then there are fires as you stated along with rust etc. To each there own though I guess... At the end of the day it is not my car. My big issue is with wraps, throw that junk in the garbage.

Mike


I respectfully 100% dissagree. There is much more evidence backing up the effectiveness of
Wraps and blankets. And I'm seeing benefits first hand.

deathshead
07-15-2013, 11:17 PM
This is a quote from a post on evolutions.net from waaaay back in 2008 on a9 second evo.

" The turbo blanket has three heavy duty metal bosses embedded in the material so you can safety wire the blanket to the turbo. The install, seriously took me 3 minutes, including twisting the SS wire with the safety wire pliers. I did the dyno pull, Trent stood in front of the car with the laser heat gun. Immediately following the pull he took a temperature reading of the turbine housing, 693 degrees F. The turbine housing, obviously at that temperature was so hot it instantly burns you. I worked on the car that hot. Right after it was installed I ran the car again, identical dyno run. Trent took another temperature reading and at the end of the pull the outside of the blanket was only 260 degrees. That's a drop of 433 degrees. After a few minutes of Trent and I talking about the results he happened to hit it again, the temp had already dropped to 130 degrees. I told him, "If that's right I should be able to touch it and not get burnt." I took the plunge, it was correct. I could lay my hand on the blanket no problem. ".

Show me a ceramic coating that can do this.

acrcpe45
07-15-2013, 11:23 PM
I respectfully 100% dissagree. There is much more evidence backing up the effectiveness of
Wraps and blankets. And I'm seeing benefits first hand.

From the DEI website...

"You can hold too much heat in the tubing and manifold to the point of changing the molecular structure of the metal. This can cause premature wear of the tubes or fractured welds. "

I rest my case, thanks DEI. Again you do what you want with your car... But the manufacturer of the wrap agrees with me.

Mike

acrcpe45
07-15-2013, 11:28 PM
This is a quote from a post on evolutions.net from waaaay back in 2008 on a9 second evo.

" The turbo blanket has three heavy duty metal bosses embedded in the material so you can safety wire the blanket to the turbo. The install, seriously took me 3 minutes, including twisting the SS wire with the safety wire pliers. I did the dyno pull, Trent stood in front of the car with the laser heat gun. Immediately following the pull he took a temperature reading of the turbine housing, 693 degrees F. The turbine housing, obviously at that temperature was so hot it instantly burns you. I worked on the car that hot. Right after it was installed I ran the car again, identical dyno run. Trent took another temperature reading and at the end of the pull the outside of the blanket was only 260 degrees. That's a drop of 433 degrees. After a few minutes of Trent and I talking about the results he happened to hit it again, the temp had already dropped to 130 degrees. I told him, "If that's right I should be able to touch it and not get burnt." I took the plunge, it was correct. I could lay my hand on the blanket no problem. ".

Show me a ceramic coating that can do this.

I stated that blankets will affect the ambient temperature... Did you miss that? However you did not address the fact that the heat that was being dissipated by the engine bay of your car is now held under the blanket.

At this point, I again defer to my comment above. DEI agrees with me. Use it at your own risk.

Mike

deathshead
07-15-2013, 11:29 PM
From the DEI website...

"You can hold too much heat in the tubing and manifold to the point of changing the molecular structure of the metal. This can cause premature wear of the tubes or fractured welds. "

I rest my case, thanks DEI. Again you do what you want with your car... But the manufacturer of the wrap agrees with me.

Mike


On headers (mild steel especially perhaps) cast iron turbine housing?
No..

acrcpe45
07-16-2013, 12:21 AM
On headers (mild steel especially perhaps) cast iron turbine housing?
No..

Lol ok, do you think their is some special cast iron or something? Physics is physics. The heat doesn't just disappear. If it is not being dissipated in to the other under hood components then where does it go?

The eutectic point of cast iron is the same as steel. The phase diagrams are very similar also because they are both ferrous alloys. Cast iron is more brittle partly because it has more carbon.

DEI backs me up, they say you can use it on cast iron, but they are very careful to disclaim that you can hold in to much heat and make make the item more brittle, as I quoted above. Other brands of wraps have disclaimer saying not to use their products on cast iron.

Whatever floats your boat. Ferrous alloys are ferrous alloys and heat soak can damage the alloy. The manufacturer of the wrap you used agrees with me.

Good luck, you made your choice, that's fine... But there is nothing wrong with stating the cons to using these products.

Mike

deathshead
07-16-2013, 08:42 AM
Thanks for the input Mike, - but if anything a blanket will slow the cool down process helping to avoid any potential issues with "brittleness"

Its a great completely safe mod. I really see a dramatic difference.

Cheers!

PTPTurboBlankets
07-16-2013, 11:08 AM
From the DEI website...

"You can hold too much heat in the tubing and manifold to the point of changing the molecular structure of the metal. This can cause premature wear of the tubes or fractured welds. "

I rest my case, thanks DEI. Again you do what you want with your car... But the manufacturer of the wrap agrees with me.

Mike

You did not disclose the full text of this. This is what it says.

Why only a " overlap, isn't more better?
More is not always better when it comes to exhaust wrap. You can hold too much heat in the tubing and manifold to the point of changing the molecular structure of the metal. This can cause premature wear of the tubes or fractured welds. Overlapping " is receommended as this allows just enough heat to emit.

Just like what DEI recommends, we recommend this to our customers as well. As long as you follow this guide, you will be fine.

acrcpe45
07-17-2013, 12:03 AM
You did not disclose the full text of this. This is what it says.

Why only a " overlap, isn't more better?
More is not always better when it comes to exhaust wrap. You can hold too much heat in the tubing and manifold to the point of changing the molecular structure of the metal. This can cause premature wear of the tubes or fractured welds. Overlapping " is receommended as this allows just enough heat to emit.

Just like what DEI recommends, we recommend this to our customers as well. As long as you follow this guide, you will be fine.

And that still doesn't change anything that I previously posted. To each their own, but there are pros and cons to using these products and I have not posted anything that is inaccurate... Nor have I said anything bad about your specific product.

You are in the business of selling these products, I make zero, zip, nada whether these products are sold or not. Use wraps and blankets at your own risk. If there is a failure due to an aftermarket wrap or heat blanket, Chrysler will more than likely not warranty it.

Mike

deathshead
07-17-2013, 09:23 AM
Mike we get it, please stop hijacking my thread with this.
You made your opinion known.

There are thousands of cars running wraps-blankets with nothing but benefits, including
Garret factory sponsored vehicles, and the list goes on. You also took the PTP article out of context to try and push your points and they corrected you. Please move on and enjoy the forums!

Update on my setup. its been 98+ Degrees the past 3 days here and my underhood temps couldnt be better!, the car couldnt run any better either. :)

acrcpe45
07-17-2013, 12:20 PM
Mike we get it, please stop hijacking my thread with this.
You made your opinion known.

There are thousands of cars running wraps-blankets with nothing but benefits, including
Garret factory sponsored vehicles, and the list goes on. You also took the PTP article out of context to try and push your points and they corrected you. Please move on and enjoy the forums!

Update on my setup. its been 98+ Degrees the past 3 days here and my underhood temps couldnt be better!, the car couldnt run any better either. :)

I'm not "hijacking" anything. I also never quoted any information from PTP, I simply replied to their comment here in this thread. From an engineering perspective I have not said anything that wasn't factual. I was actually done based on your last comment... But then PTP decided to reply, so I responded.

I'm sorry you do not want to accept the fact that blankets and wraps, while making ambient temps around other components "cooler" because they are not absorbing the heat generated, hold heat in to the turbo, exhaust, and engine. To each their own, you have decided to take that risk, but others may not.

As I stated, you choose what you want, but there are pros and cons to everything. You made you choice, great. Hopefully you won't have any issues using these products.

Take care,

Mike

BigDaddySRT
07-17-2013, 01:47 PM
You did not disclose the full text of this. This is what it says.

Why only a " overlap, isn't more better?
More is not always better when it comes to exhaust wrap. You can hold too much heat in the tubing and manifold to the point of changing the molecular structure of the metal. This can cause premature wear of the tubes or fractured welds. Overlapping " is receommended as this allows just enough heat to emit.

Just like what DEI recommends, we recommend this to our customers as well. As long as you follow this guide, you will be fine.

The OP bought their Exhaust Wrap from Amazon.com.... so both PTP and DEI have no worries about the OP emailing them for Warranty Services or Product Problems.

deathshead
07-18-2013, 03:04 PM
Who said I would reach out to anyone for Warranty support?
However the wrap is DEI.

where are you people coming up with all this?

It was a simple install - results thread.


http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/400x/30264156.jpg

shagghie
07-18-2013, 03:16 PM
I'm not "hijacking" anything. I also never quoted any information from PTP, I simply replied to their comment here in this thread. From an engineering perspective I have not said anything that wasn't factual. I was actually done based on your last comment... But then PTP decided to reply, so I responded.

I'm sorry you do not want to accept the fact that blankets and wraps, while making ambient temps around other components "cooler" because they are not absorbing the heat generated, hold heat in to the turbo, exhaust, and engine. To each their own, you have decided to take that risk, but others may not.

As I stated, you choose what you want, but there are pros and cons to everything. You made you choice, great. Hopefully you won't have any issues using these products.

Take care,

Mike

The exhaust side of the turbo benefits from more heat, and also generates faster moving exhaust gasses, which is good for, well, everything. The turbo spools up faster, for one thing! And especially for people running an intake with the filter element under the hood, it also helps the air going into the engine and the cold side of the turbo be denser. This is something you do when tuning a car to prolong engine life and keep temps under control....

opiateESP
07-18-2013, 04:20 PM
So I finally got around to installing my generic Amazon Turbo blanket today.
$51 bucks on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B51XJC4/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Very Simple install, All you have to do it pop off your heat shield top, and bracket.

Then, pop off the "Jesus Clip" off the wastegate arm. (YES I LOST IT GODDAMMIT!!,
But I ended up using a quality stainless steel mechanics wire to secure it, even better than the stock clip..)

Then stick the blanket over your turbine housing, you will see where you need to make a cut.
Get a sharp pair of scissors and cut a slot for the wastegate shaft. this stuff cuts easy with good scissors.

Next, stick your finger on the stud that sticks up for the bracket, get a razor blade and cut an X and then push the blanket over.

The blanket has small clips so you can use mechanics wire to secure the blanket but I didn't use any.
This is because its tight in there, I was able to just tuck the blanket in place its nice and snug,
Then reinstall your stock heat shield and bracket, this squishes the turbo blanket in place nice and secure.


This is a 15minute install but I discovered I had an exhaust leak at my turbo V-band. Shucks!
I had to unbolt the downpipe move it around a bit and crank the hell out of the V-band clamp bolt.
The stock Gasket is tissue paper thin a nice new thick gasket would have been nice...

Anyways. I then decided to wrap my catless downpipe.
I used DEI titanium via Amazon. It was around $20 Bucks.

This was a bit of a pain due to the fact that I was not pulling the downpipe out of the car
and when i installed it I installed the lower heat shield. you have to pull the dp to get that shield off.

So, I was able to wrap down a few inches past the O2 sensor, I then went underneath and wrapped the
Midpipe to keep heat away from the cold side plumbing.

Took the car out for a hard hour long run, 10 miles in you will see a little smoke as it breaks in.

Hour long run, stop and pop the hood and i'm noticing a ***HUGE*** improvement in underhood temps.



That turned out fantastic. I might just have to copy you on this... for the price, that's brilliant.

2Cool
08-12-2013, 09:17 PM
Just installed this, reinstalled both the stock heat shield and bracket over top of it.

After a spirited test drive it was smoking... enough to make me get the fire extinguisher and set it by the car.

Anyone notice this? Is it something that will go away?

Tweak
08-13-2013, 12:03 AM
Just installed this, reinstalled both the stock heat shield and bracket over top of it.

After a spirited test drive it was smoking... enough to make me get the fire extinguisher and set it by the car.

Anyone notice this? Is it something that will go away?

I hear they have a literal "burn-in" period and will smoke awhile then eventually stop.

deathshead
08-13-2013, 03:16 PM
ya it will go away pretty quickly, I gave mine a nice hard mountain run then stopped at a light and there was a bunch of smoke coming out of my heat extractor vent. The smoke stopped after around 15-20 minutes.

Tiny Turbo
06-15-2015, 09:00 AM
I want to do this now but I also don't want anybody seeing my car smoking lol. It was embarassing enough to ride with my brother after he did a seafoam treatment on his pickup truck. He stopped traffic because they couldn't see through the cloud, LOL.

Also I wasn't aware that you have to give your car a few minutes to cool itself down after a hard run to avoid damage. Define "hard run" because now I'm a bit worried... Would one quick full throttle sprint be a hard run? I want to be nice to my turbo from now on...

Tiny Turbo
06-24-2015, 08:50 AM
So I finally got around to installing my generic Amazon Turbo blanket today.
$51 bucks on amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B51XJC4/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


I fallowed the link to the turbo blanket and it isn't working. Do you remember the size/brand/name? Thanks.

stubtail
06-24-2015, 09:22 AM
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SA44K0E?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

I ordered this one. I guess they employ blind seamstresses to cut the material and check quality. There are holes large enough to put your finger through around several of the grommets. They are sending me another one w/o hassle though.

NoTec
06-24-2015, 09:36 AM
I want to do this now but I also don't want anybody seeing my car smoking lol. It was embarassing enough to ride with my brother after he did a seafoam treatment on his pickup truck. He stopped traffic because they couldn't see through the cloud, LOL.

Also I wasn't aware that you have to give your car a few minutes to cool itself down after a hard run to avoid damage. Define "hard run" because now I'm a bit worried... Would one quick full throttle sprint be a hard run? I want to be nice to my turbo from now on...

So if you watch professional motorsports events, you have noticed that drivers/riders always perform a cool down lap. It is to get temperatures of all components (power train, brakes, etc) under control.

Tiny Turbo
06-24-2015, 10:03 AM
So if you watch professional motorsports events, you have noticed that drivers/riders always perform a cool down lap. It is to get temperatures of all components (power train, brakes, etc) under control.

Yeah I didn't really notice that, only racing events I go to watch are held at the local dragstrips and I believe they use many different secret/redneck methods to cool the engines down lol.

Velodrome
07-10-2015, 04:38 AM
My question is. If the dealer takes note you have a turbo blanket and you later have a turbo failure for WHATEVER reason. Will your warranty request be denied?

Trunkout
07-10-2015, 11:37 AM
my question is. If the dealer takes note you have a turbo blanket and you later have a turbo failure for whatever reason. Will your warranty request be denied?

ding ding ding ding