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View Full Version : learned the hard way when I stripped out the threads of my front hub.



JackandSue
05-24-2013, 04:21 PM
A friend of mine at the track last week thought he was helping when he used an impact on the Fiat and crossed threaded one of the lug bolts so badly that it ruined the front hub. $400 dollars later and after I found another problem with the rear hub I was able to tap it out I decided that I had to do something.
Most of you guys probably already know this but I found a web site (apexcompetition.com ) that carries performance studs and steel lug bolts to replace our oem lugbolts. So I ordered a set and hope this will work out better for me.

mr_robs
05-24-2013, 06:33 PM
Always start your lugs by hand! This same thing happend to a friend of mine. He used an impact gun to blast on his wheel bolt and then the wheel came off 10 minutes later driving down the road..

Really sucks to hear that about your hub, i would have beat my friend senseless if they had done that to my car!

stratofortress
05-24-2013, 06:38 PM
If the OEM bolts aren't steel, what are they? Aluminum?

BTW if my friend did that to my car I'd make a herd of guinea pigs run over him.

2Cool
05-24-2013, 06:46 PM
Always recommend hand snugging then coming back to torque to 70-80ft/lbs. 12mm is pretty tiny, anyone using an impact on them is likely an idiot.

Giuseppe
05-24-2013, 06:56 PM
I've got G5 titanium studs and nuts if you don't like the set you picked up.

lammie200
05-24-2013, 08:06 PM
Another good idea is to spray them with WD-40 or something similar. Oiled or greased bolts will be less likely to cross thread and torque up better than dry bolts.

Tweak
05-24-2013, 08:44 PM
I hope the friend at least offered to pay for the damage, even some of the damage if not all of it. Hope the replacements work for you.

Abarth Phreak
05-24-2013, 08:59 PM
Crikey mate!!! That's suckin aweful...waitin for status on new stud kit to see how they are damaged.

BTW...is this one of those "My Friend" stories and it was really you????sillylol

JackandSue
05-24-2013, 09:04 PM
Crikey mate!!! That's suckin aweful...waitin for status on new stud kit to see how they are damaged.

BTW...is this one of those "My Friend" stories and it was really you????sillylol
He's a good kid and besides he still owes me on the race car i sold him :)

DS Ocampo
05-25-2013, 12:59 AM
My lil brother did that with his truck off-roading.. lost all his lugs .. I went to help but the studs were just FUBAR,,, I had a few pairs of vise grip pliers I snugged down on the studs... 2 miles and a few times 're adjusting those things back on and got him home ....

Fiat500USA
05-25-2013, 03:16 AM
I've seen some guys at shops just chuck the bolt in a gun and slam m' home! Makes me cringe...

dart1.4t
05-25-2013, 04:11 AM
yeah, sounds like he watches too much nascar!!! nascar studs are piloted and those guys get a lot of practice with a calibrated gun. some people think that's how it's done in the real world.

jguerdat
05-25-2013, 07:06 AM
Another good idea is to spray them with WD-40 or something similar. Oiled or greased bolts will be less likely to cross thread and torque up better than dry bolts.

Not so fast. Torque specs for wheels are based on DRY threads, not lubricated. You can easily over-torque by reducing the expected friction. That said, many folks seem to use anti-sieze on the threads whilst ensuring none is on the wheel/bolt/nut interface.

lammie200
05-25-2013, 10:51 AM
Not so fast. Torque specs for wheels are based on DRY threads, not lubricated. You can easily over-torque by reducing the expected friction. That said, many folks seem to use anti-sieze on the threads whilst ensuring none is on the wheel/bolt/nut interface.

Two schools of thought on the issue. Given the 10%-25% inaccuracy on most torque wrenches, and corrosives like salt that can be in contact with hubs and lug nuts, I don't see a problem using some lubricant or anti-seize compound on lug nut threads. There is even a decent spread between the recommended torque for using steel wheels (63lbs/ft) versus aluminum wheels (75lbs/ft.) Bolts like lug nuts should still have plenty of thread grind even with a bit of lubricant or anti-seize, so I wouldn't think that over tightening would be a huge issue if you took care in doing them up.

pastor passum
05-25-2013, 04:57 PM
Even Permatex states you shouldn't use anti-seize on wheel lugs due to the tendency to over torque or stretch the bolt or lug. I've ridden BMW motorcycles for 30 years (shaft drive with lugs much like our Fiats holding the rear wheel on) and the adage is "mount it dry unless you want to die". I don't want any kind of lubricant on my wheel lugs. But...that's just me;)

jguerdat
05-26-2013, 07:39 AM
It'd be better to clean the threads so they're similar to new than to try to out-guess the engineers with the data at hand...